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(Netflix)

“Tiger King” has become a streaming sensation during the coronavirus pandemic, but accredited zoos and aquariums aren’t entertained by the unsavory practices on display.

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Brookfield Zoo recently welcomed a new pair of lions. (Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society)

Brutus and Titus, 4-year-old brothers, arrived at their new home in mid-March. Learn more about the African lions during a Facebook Live chat on Thursday.

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Charger the sea lion cozies up to a Valentine’s Day cake. (Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society)

From gorillas chomping on heart-shaped biscuits to sea lions digging into a gelatin cake, Brookfield Zoo’s Valentine’s Day celebration has warmed our hearts.

            

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Brookfield Zoo lions Zenda, left, and Isis. (Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society)

Following what appears to have been a tragic accident, the zoo reported the death of its female African lion, Isis, less than two weeks after the loss of her mate, Zenda.

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(Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo)

A groundbreaking program to study urban wildlife using a network of motion-triggered cameras is expanding to Canada and South Africa. 

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(Jillian Braun / Lincoln Park Zoo)

When it comes to picking a place to live, many Chicago-area mice tend to be city dwellers rather than suburbanites, according to initial results from an ongoing study by Lincoln Park Zoo.

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(Urban Wildlife Institute / Chicago Park District)

A camera set up near Rosehill Cemetery captured an unusual photo of a flying squirrel last fall, but the image was only recently discovered.

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(Anne Brooke / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

Microphones placed across the Chicago area by the Lincoln Park Zoo are tracking the return of bats to the region this spring. 

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A group of coyotes captured by a motion-detected camera in Chicago. (Courtesy of Lincoln Park Zoo)

Since 2010, the zoo’s Urban Wildlife Institute has used motion-detecting cameras and acoustic monitoring equipment to record and document animals roaming through the city.

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A Guam kingfisher at Lincoln Park Zoo. This type of bird now only exists in captivity. (Heather Paul / Flickr)

In the mid-1980s, the Lincoln Park Zoo and Brookfield Zoo set up critical captive breeding populations of two bird species native to the Pacific Islands. A new report from the Center for Biological Diversity underscores the impact of such programs.

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Chicago Science Festival 2015. (Monica Metzler / Illinois Science Council)

The second annual festival promises a treat for the scientifically curious, whether your interests lie in psychology and neuroscience or Chicago's urban wildlife and HBO's popular "Game of Thrones" series.

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