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(Netflix)

“Tiger King” has become a streaming sensation during the coronavirus pandemic, but accredited zoos and aquariums aren’t entertained by the unsavory practices on display.

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Brookfield Zoo recently welcomed a new pair of lions. (Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society)

Brutus and Titus, 4-year-old brothers, arrived at their new home in mid-March. Learn more about the African lions during a Facebook Live chat on Thursday.

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Charger the sea lion cozies up to a Valentine’s Day cake. (Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society)

From gorillas chomping on heart-shaped biscuits to sea lions digging into a gelatin cake, Brookfield Zoo’s Valentine’s Day celebration has warmed our hearts.

            

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Brookfield Zoo lions Zenda, left, and Isis. (Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society)

Following what appears to have been a tragic accident, the zoo reported the death of its female African lion, Isis, less than two weeks after the loss of her mate, Zenda.

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(Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo)

A groundbreaking program to study urban wildlife using a network of motion-triggered cameras is expanding to Canada and South Africa. 

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(Jillian Braun / Lincoln Park Zoo)

When it comes to picking a place to live, many Chicago-area mice tend to be city dwellers rather than suburbanites, according to initial results from an ongoing study by Lincoln Park Zoo.

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(Urban Wildlife Institute / Chicago Park District)

A camera set up near Rosehill Cemetery captured an unusual photo of a flying squirrel last fall, but the image was only recently discovered.

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(Anne Brooke / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

Microphones placed across the Chicago area by the Lincoln Park Zoo are tracking the return of bats to the region this spring. 

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A group of coyotes captured by a motion-detected camera in Chicago. (Courtesy of Lincoln Park Zoo)

Since 2010, the zoo’s Urban Wildlife Institute has used motion-detecting cameras and acoustic monitoring equipment to record and document animals roaming through the city.

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A Guam kingfisher at Lincoln Park Zoo. This type of bird now only exists in captivity. (Heather Paul / Flickr)

In the mid-1980s, the Lincoln Park Zoo and Brookfield Zoo set up critical captive breeding populations of two bird species native to the Pacific Islands. A new report from the Center for Biological Diversity underscores the impact of such programs.

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The Lincoln Park Zoo welcomed the birth of a female Grevy's zebra on Saturday. (Todd Rosenberg / Lincoln Park Zoo)

The Lincoln Park Zoo welcomed the birth of a female zebra on Saturday. It's the first zebra birth at the zoo since 2012.

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The Lincoln Park Zoo unveiled plans Thursday for major renovations to the Kovler Lion House and the construction of a new polar bear exhibit.

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Chicago Science Festival 2015. (Monica Metzler / Illinois Science Council)

The second annual festival promises a treat for the scientifically curious, whether your interests lie in psychology and neuroscience or Chicago's urban wildlife and HBO's popular "Game of Thrones" series.

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The snow monkey, born on Wednesday, has since clung tightly to 11-year-old mother Ono. Zoo employees have not yet named it or determined its sex. Maureen Leahy, the zoo’s curator of primates, said they prefer to give mother and infant plenty of space at this stage.

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Grevy’s zebra born at Brookfield Zoo on July 7 with her mom, Kali.

There's a new kid on the block at Brookfield Zoo. On Tuesday, a female zebra was born at the near west suburban zoo to mother Kali, 5, and father Nazim, 15. The birth marks the first addition of a zebra of this type at Brookfield Zoo since 1998.