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A view looking north from the Field Museum in Chicago captured at 8:25 a.m. Jan. 23, 2022, by a National Weather Service camera. (Courtesy of National Weather Service.)

As of 6 a.m. Sunday, snowfall totals measured 3.6 inches at Midway Airport, 3.5 inches at O’Hare Airport and 2.8 inches in Romeoville, according to the National Weather Service. Another round of snow is expected Monday morning. 

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The Doomsday Clock is set at 100 seconds to midnight for the third year in a row. (Courtesy of Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists)

“Steady is not good news,” said members of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. “We are stuck in a perilous moment.”

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Photos taken on Interstate-94 near Porter County, Indiana, show weather conditions scarcely 2 miles apart. (Indiana Department of Transportation)

A couple of Indiana highway cameras caught lake effect snow in action Thursday morning, offering a picture-perfect snapshot of one of the region’s quirkier weather phenomena.

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A bighead carp, a type of Asian carp, caught in the Illinois River. (Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is flush with billions of dollars following passage of the bipartisan infrastructure bill. Some of those funds are being funneled toward critical projects in the Chicago region, the Corps announced Wednesday. 

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(Karsten Würth / Unsplash)

Upcoming virtual town halls will give Chicagoans a chance to learn about and weigh in on plans to update the city’s climate action plan, from emission reduction targets to renewable energy goals.

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(Provided)

That transformation will be both physical, encompassing major interior renovations to create immersive exhibits, but will also entail a transformation of mission with more educational programming for Chicago school students.

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Some assembly required. Chicago's first Motus tower, during installation at Big Marsh Park. (Edward Warden / Chicago Ornithological Society)

The radio antenna, positioned at Big Marsh Park on the Southeast Side, helps fill a Chicago-sized gap in a growing network of receivers that's tracking the movement of migratory birds and other animals.   

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Titus, an African lion, channeling his inner house cat. (Jim Schulz / CZS-Brookfield Zoo)

Most of Brookfield Zoo’s 700 Christmas trees were shredded for mulch. But some were used by keepers’ to shake up animals’ routines. The results were entertaining. 

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A tractor sits in front of a pile of salt used to create a brine that will help clear road of ice and snow ahead of a winter storm at the GDOT's Maintenance Activities Unit location on Friday, Jan. 14, 2022, in Forest Park, Ga. (AP Photo / Brynn Anderson)

By Friday, the fast-moving storm had already dropped heavy snow across a large swath of the Midwest, where travel conditions deteriorated and scores of schools closed or moved to online instruction. Iowa was hit the hardest.

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(Patty Wetli / WTTW News)

In honor of Monday’s Martin Luther King Day of Service, Cook County Forest Preserves is hosting volunteer activities at a number of sites across the forest preserve district, from habitat restoration to litter cleanups.

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"Guien" on its upward trajectory, photographed Dec. 26, 2021. The stalk is growing 3 to 4 inches a day. (Patty Wetli / WTTW News)

The agave’s stalk — which it shoots up before the plant’s once-in-a-lifetime bloom — has already blown away predictions of its top height, and it's still growing. Where it will stop, nobody knows.

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Vivek Shandas, a professor of climate adaptation at Portland State University, takes a temperature reading of almost 106 degrees in downtown Portland, Ore., on Aug. 12, 2021. (Nathan Howard / AP Photo, File)

Earth simmered to the sixth hottest year on record in 2021, according to several newly released temperature measurements.

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Goldfish swimming, not driving. (Sanjiv Nayak / Unsplash )

A man receives the first pig heart transplant. Astronomers witness a star go supernova. Researchers identify a biomarker of depression. And a goldfish goes for a drive. 

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A falconry hood is placed over the eagle's eyes and ears to help relax the bird and make the exam easier on the bird and handlers. (Courtesy of Willowbrook Wildlife Center)

Eagles don't eat rat poison, but they do eat the critters that take the bait. The powerful toxins keep blood from clotting, and a recently rescued eagle would have bled to death from a tiny cut, said the veterinarian caring for the bird. 

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(Patty Wetli / WTTW News)

Studies show temperatures of -30°F will kill 98% of ash borer beetle larvae. Guess when Chicago was last that cold.

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(Nikolas Noonan / Unsplash)

According to a federal report released Monday, the U.S. experienced 20 billion-dollar weather and climate disasters in 2021, including hurricanes, wildfires and out-of-season December tornadoes.