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The new instruction plan includes the distribution of 100,000 technology devices to the highest-need families as well as both online and non-digital learning activities.

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(Brandis Friedman / WTTW News)

With Illinois schools closed through at least April 7 – and April 20 in Chicago – parents are suddenly finding themselves thrust into an uncomfortable new role: their children’s educator.

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The Board of Education unanimously voted to approve the spending authority, which CPS says it will use to fund emergency personnel, remote learning and meal distribution.

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(WTTW News)

The nation’s academic institutions are shifting operations online to bring instruction to students at their homes all over the country — and even the world. We check in with some local universities.

District seeks permission to spend up to $75M on coronavirus response

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Chicago Public Schools is seeking to spend up to $75 million to address and maintain “critical services” during the COVID-19 pandemic. But that request and the rest of the board’s monthly meeting will be heard online rather than in person.

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Mayor Lori Lightfoot addresses the city of Chicago in a televised address on Thursday, March 19, 2020. (WTTW News)

Chicago’s public schools were set to reopen by the end of the month, but students will instead remain out of class until April 21, according to Mayor Lori Lightfoot.

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Chicago Public Schools buildings will only be open to provide food and enrichment activity supplies to families during COVID-19 closures. 

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(WTTW News)

Gov. J.B. Pritzker is ordering the closure of all public and private K-12 schools across the state, including Chicago Public Schools, starting Tuesday. It’s the largest closure to date related to the spread of the novel coronavirus in Illinois.

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CPS CEO Janice Jackson, left, and Chicago Department of Public Health Deputy Commissioner Jennifer Layden discuss the school district’s COVID-19 response at a press conference Tuesday, March 10, 2020. (WTTW News)

No additional students or faculty members at Vaughn Occupational High School have tested positive for COVID-19 after one staffer was found to have contracted the virus last week.

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This illustration provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in January 2020 shows the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV).

A Chicago woman in her 50s who works at Chicago Public Schools in the city’s Portage Park neighborhood has tested positive for COVID-19. 

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Former Lincoln Park High School interim Principal John Thuet and the former assistant Principal Michelle Brumfield appear on “Chicago Tonight” on Feb. 27, 2020. (WTTW News)

Former school administrators John Thuet and Michelle Brumfield were ousted amid “multiple allegations of serious misconduct.” But in an exclusive interview with “Chicago Tonight,” they say CPS has told them nothing about those allegations.

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(WTTW News)

Whether or not Chicago Public Schools students are gaming a standardized test system was the topic of debate during Wednesday’s CPS board meeting.

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Lincoln Park High School (WTTW News)

Former interim principal John Thuet and assistant principal Michelle Brumfield claim CPS disseminated “unfounded, false statements” about them after they were fired last month.

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Students at Chicago Public Schools have headed back to class earlier and earlier in recent years, but the proposed schedule for next year has classes begin well into September and end late in June.

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Sarah Touhy, left, a 2019 graduate of McHenry High School’s East Campus and Breanna Darcy, a senior at McHenry High School’s West Campus, pose for a picture on Jan. 15 in the biomedical science classroom at the east campus. (Courtesy of McHenry High School)

Two students who took a biomedical science class in the northwest suburbs say the program prepared them for stressful real-life situations. “Everyone should know what goes on in the body and how things work,” said Sarah Touhy.

District contends findings don’t “call into question the accomplishments of our students”

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(Don Harder / Flickr)

CPS Inspector General Nicholas Schuler said analyses conducted by his office found possible “gaming and cheating techniques,” including longer than average test durations and high numbers of pauses.

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