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Dance for Life (Photo by Todd Rosenberg)

Dancers, perhaps more than any other group of performing artists, have been hit hardest, both artistically and financially, by the fallout from the coronavirus. So this year’s Dance for Life 2020 event will feature a new virtual format.

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Phil Rosenthal, left, digs into peach cobbler and ice cream during the Chicago episode of "Somebody Feed Phil." (Courtesy of Shawn Michelle's Ice Cream)

Chicago’s restaurant scene has been hit hard during the coronavirus pandemic. A new episode of the Netflix series “Somebody Feed Phil,” which filmed in the city in 2019, serves as a reminder of why these businesses are worth saving.

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"Chicago Transit Hikes" showcases trails accessible via CTA, Metro or the South Shore Line. (Credits: Patty Wetli / WTTW News; Belt Publishing; Lindsay Welbers)

A new guidebook showcases the region’s best hiking trails accessible via the CTA, Metra or the South Shore Line. Because someday, we’ll ride trains again.

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Ramsey Lewis speaks with WTTW News via videoconference.

Birthday celebrations during the pandemic have gotten creative, but there haven’t been too many birthday concerts. Chicago jazz composer and pianist Ramsey Lewis is adding that to the list this weekend.

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(WTTW News)

Longtime Chicago Ald. Roman Pucinski once said, “There’s nothing as crucial to an alderman as garbage.” So how did garbage cans become a source and symbol of political power in this city? Geoffrey Baer talks trash.

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(Courtesy of Writers Theatre)

How do you design a pandemic-era theater season? The Glencoe-based theater has devised a multifaceted plan that combines a degree of certainty with the option of built-in flexibility, with the ultimate goal of keeping live theater alive.

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A new virtual art gallery is starting a conversation on why the current stay-at-home order isn’t ideal for everyone, as it explores race and social class issues.

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Chicago is home to an armory of art created by members of our armed forces. With Memorial Day in mind, we visited a museum with a mission.

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Chicago is taking some of its popular music fests online. (Courtesy Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events)

The Millennium Park at Home series will deliver concerts online via YouTube and Facebook, kicking off Memorial Day weekend with a virtual version of the House Music Festival.

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(Free-Photos / Pixabay)

They must remain closed to the public under the governor’s stay-at-home order, but live music venues in Illinois can now allow small numbers of musicians and staff inside to record and livestream performances. 

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A young woman takes a photo with Adam Hollingsworth, also known as the Dreadhead Cowboy, and his 13-year-old horse Prince in the Woodlawn neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side on Saturday, May 16. (Evan Garcia / WTTW News)

There’s a cowboy riding through Chicago’s South and West side neighborhoods, introducing residents young and old to what is likely an unfamiliar animal — at least on their residential streets: horses.

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A promotional image for “Il Postino (The Postman).” (Credit: Joe Mazza)

Amid all the dire warnings that live performances might not start up again until 2021, the news that the richly creative company plans to begin its three-production season in November comes as an enormous spirit-raiser.

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Tyler Saladino (Courtesy of MBC Sports Korea)

Tyler Saladino had some exciting moments on the South Side when he spent parts of four seasons with the White Sox. Now he’s on the field in South Korea.

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The Hyde Park Suzuki Institute is offering virtual classes during the pandemic. (WTTW News)

As we enter the third month of Illinois’ stay-at-home order, a look at how the Hyde Park Suzuki Institute is getting “extra creative” as it moves its classes online.

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(Alexas_Fotos / Pixabay)

Join Chicagoans and their pooches across the city each night at 8 p.m. to show your support for health care workers, first responders and essential employees by howling.

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(WTTW News)

We check out the Extreme Protection Suits created by Chicago-based artist and art teacher Claire Ashley, who says she was intersted in “using humor as a way to deal with trauma.”

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