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(WTTW News)

Connecting more people to quality internet, the latest push in bridging the digital divide. Plus, the first Black woman named to the state’s Supreme Court. And the Last Word from Chicago French Press.

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(WTTW News)

The Internet Equity Initiative is analyzing data from the U.S. Census and city of Chicago Data Portal which shows 80% of Chicago households are online, but there are deep disparities between neighborhoods. In some neighborhoods, especially on the South and West sides, nearly 40% of the neighborhood doesn’t have internet.

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 Justice Lisa Holder White appears on “Chicago Tonight: Black Voices” on May 14, 2022. (WTTW News)

The state’s highest court will soon have its first Black woman justice as Fourth District Appellate Court Judge Lisa Holder White is set to replace Justice Rita Garman, who’s retiring this summer. Holder White’s term begins in July. 

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Chicago French Press Founder and CEO Kris Christian appears on "Chicago Tonight: Black Voices" on May 15, 2022. (WTTW News)

While many companies struggled during the pandemic, Chicago French Press saw sales skyrocket. The coffee brand can now be found on Amazon and in several stores, including Chicago-area Targets, which started selling the products in February. 

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(WTTW News)

A grim Mother’s Day for moms of missing or murdered daughters, as they search for answers. The head of the Chicago Community Trust is heading to Spelman. And Black Americans in the Victorian era.

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King Walker and Diamond Bynum have been missing since 2015. (Submitted)

In 2021, 521,705 people were reported missing, according to the National Crime Information Center. Of that number, 89,020 were Black women and girls. That means despite making up about 7% of the U.S. population, Black women and girls were 17% of missing person cases last year.

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Dr. Helene Gayle, president and CEO of the Chicago Community Trust. (Credit: Chicago Community Trust)

The first Black woman to lead the Chicago Community Trust, Dr. Helene Gayle, will leave her role in June to serve as president of Spelman College in Atlanta. 

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(WTTW)

The birth and growth of gospel music in Chicago is the subject of the latest episode of WTTW’s documentary series, “Chicago Stories.”

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(WTTW News)

The life expectancy gap between Black and white Chicagoans widens again. The city moves forward in testing a guaranteed income program. A former Secret Service agent receives a presidential pardon.

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Mayor Lori Lightfoot speaks at the April 27, 2022, Chicago City Council meeting. (WTTW News)

Eligible applicants will be entered into a lottery to determine who will get $500 a month for one year. Ultimately, 5,000 households will receive checks in one of the largest tests of guaranteed income across the country.

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(WTTW News)

For the first time in decades, life expectancy for Black Chicagoans fell below 70 years old. In 2020, the gap in life expectancy between Black and White residents was 10 years, an increase from 8.8 years in 2017. Overall, life expectancy in Chicago dropped almost two years from 2019 to 2020.

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“61st Street” is set in Woodlawn and explores the relationship between community, police and the courts. (Courtesy of AMC)

A new television series shot on Chicago’s South Side is airing now on AMC. “61st Street” is set in Woodlawn and explores the relationship between community, police and the courts.

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(WTTW News)

Neutralizing environmental racism in a crossover edition of Voices, on this Earth Day weekend. Diagnosing autism. A story of freedom told through opera. And the city’s oldest Black camera club.

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(WTTW News)

Autism affects about one in 44 children, and while therapists say early intervention is key to treating it effectively, Black children are five times more likely to be misdiagnosed or diagnosed later in life.

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(WTTW News)

Chicago’s environmental justice advocates are working to address the systematic structures that created these inequities. They say a greener future is possible as long as the city and industry are willing to do the work.   

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(WTTW News)

Washington Park Camera Club members are combining their passion for pictures with early Chicago history to celebrate Frederick Law Olmsted.