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In this Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, file photo, Kim Bertini looks over some of the 15,000 dead fish that washed up near her backyard on Lake Madeline in Galveston, Texas. (Jennifer Reynolds / The Galveston County Daily News via AP, File)

Oxygen levels have dropped in hundreds of lakes in the United States and Europe over the last four decades, a new study found. And the authors said declining oxygen could lead to increased fish kills, algal blooms and methane emissions.

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The Field Museum has more than 2 million fish in its research collections. (Patty Wetli / WTTW News)

Millions of specimens collected by the Field, not for exhibits but for scientific study, are unlocking mysteries of evolution and could answer questions about climate change.

Can you put a price tag on damaged natural resources?

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The Little Calumet River. (Charles Morris / National Park Service)

State and federal agencies are still assessing how much damage was done to natural resources in Northwest Indiana as a result of the 2019 discharge of hazardous chemicals into a Lake Michigan tributary.  

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A massive sturgeon, caught May 2021 in the Detroit River. (Jason Fischer / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

The 240-pound, 100-year-old, nearly 7-foot-long sturgeon is making headlines. But fish that size used to be common in the Great Lakes and maybe, thanks to restoration efforts, they will be again.

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Specimens of the round goby were among the species included in the micro plastics study. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service / Eric Engbretson)

Working with specimens in the Field Museum’s collections, researchers from Loyola University Chicago found microplastics in fish dating back to the 1950s. “Plastic is everywhere,” the scientists said. 

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A group of suckers on the move in Door County, Wisconsin, during a previous migration. (Courtesy of Shedd Aquarium)

Shedd Aquarium researchers are eagerly anticipating the spring migration of sucker fish, a species that could tell us about climate change.

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What’s so special about this fish? It’s all about the little yellow tag. (Metropolitan Water Reclamation District)

A largemouth bass fished from the Skokie River provided proof of the success of a 2018 dam removal on the Chicago River.

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A silver carp captured in June 2017 in the Illinois Waterway below the T.J. O’Brien Lock and Dam, about 9 miles from Lake Michigan. (Courtesy Illinois Department of Natural Resources)

If you can’t beat ‘em, eat ‘em. That’s the apparent strategy behind a new state grant program that will provide funding to companies that harvest and sell Asian carp.

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(Frank McNamara / Flickr)

The Trump administration’s plan to roll back limits on toxic mercury pollution will harm Great Lakes fish – and potentially those who eat them, advocates say.

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Robert Schuffler

Last Thursday, Robert Schuffler, the original owner of Robert’s Fish Market, died at age 97. In 2011, Jay Shefsky visited the West Rogers Park market. Chicago Tonight revisits that story.

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Jay Shefsky introduces us to a suburban fisherman who began carving fish out of wood when his taxidermy collection filled his entire basement.

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Jay Shefsky introduces us to a suburban fisherman who began carving fish out of wood when his taxidermy collection filled his entire basement.

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We meet a suburban man whose passion for fish and fishing knows no bounds. Don Dubin is an expert taxidermist, a world champion fish carver, and he's been named a "legendary angler" in the Fresh Water Fishing Hall of Fame. Jay Shefsky has the story.

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Jay Shefsky has the story of an unusual friendship that led a Mexican immigrant to own the last kosher fish market in the Chicago area.