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(Meagan Davis / Wikimedia Commons)

A high-profile effort to convince Illinois lawmakers to change the way the state draws congressional and state legislative districts has fizzled out after the coronavirus pandemic shut down the General Assembly.

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This April 5, 2020, photo shows a 2020 census letter mailed to a U.S. resident in Detroit. (AP Photo / Paul Sancya)

The U.S. Census Bureau needs more time to wrap up the once-a-decade count because of the coronavirus, opening the possibility of delays in drawing new legislative districts that could help determine what political party is in power.

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(Meagan Davis / Wikimedia Commons)

Previous attempts to end gerrymandering in Illinois have come up short, but a coalition of advocacy groups are at it once again.

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Illinois’ oddly shaped 4th Congressional District. (WTTW News)

As states prepare to draw new election boundaries after the 2020 census, what can be done to ensure those maps give equal weight to all votes? Behind the practice of gerrymandering and the movement to curb it.

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(Joe Ravi / Wikimedia Commons)

On its final day before a summer break, the Supreme Court issues major rulings on a census citizenship question and the very controversial practice of political gerrymandering. Former Supreme Court clerks weigh in.

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In this June 20, 2019 file photo, the Supreme Court is seen under stormy skies in Washington. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite, File)

In two politically charged rulings, the Supreme Court dealt a huge blow Thursday to efforts to combat the drawing of electoral districts for partisan gain but also put a hold on the Trump administration’s effort to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

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(Daderot / Wikimedia Commons)

Although a ninth judge has yet to be confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court, the show must go on. The eight justices returned to the Temple of Justice this week to hear a new set of lawsuits.

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Hear from state lawmakers about where remap reform goes after a recent proposal was shot down by a divided Illinois Supreme Court. 

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The effort to take on powerful interests like House Speaker Michael Madigan and end partisan legislative map drawing may yet have life. Find out what the Independent Maps group plans to do.

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The head of the Chicago Police Board on what it will take to change the culture of the department and restore public confidence.

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The Illinois Supreme Court late Thursday evening ruled that the question of map drawing cannot appear before voters on the November ballot. The process will remain in the hands of state power brokers like House Speaker Michael Madigan.

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Lori Lightfoot, who represents the Independent Map Amendment, and state Sen. Kwame Raoul, who introduced a competing redistricting plan earlier this year, discuss the latest in the court fight over redistricting.

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The two top editors from the Chicago Tribune and Sun-Times share their thoughts on the Republican National Convention. A modest tax rebate is coming to Chicago property owners. And the Cubs get back to their winning ways. Join Eddie Arruza and guests for these stories and more.

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The latest attempt to wrest control of legislative redistricting from state lawmakers was handed a setback Wednesday morning. 

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Days after a bipartisan group filed a constitutional amendment that would take redistricting out of the hands of state lawmakers, a lawsuit was filed to get the proposal thrown out.

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There’s a renewed push for redistricting reform in Illinois. Independent Maps, a nonpartisan statewide coalition, is starting a campaign for a constitutional amendment creating a non-partisan independent commission responsible for drawing Illinois General Assembly districts. Paris Schutz has the latest on the coalition’s efforts.