|
“Chicago Party Aunt,” which starts streaming on Sept. 17, follows the adventures of Diane Dunbrowski, the boisterous namesake of the series, and her nephew Rory O’Malley, who’s taking a gap year before attending Stanford. (Courtesy Netflix)

She’s our local bad influence: the Chicago Party Aunt debuts this week on Netflix. We check in with writer and actor Chris Witaske, the creator of the notorious Twitter account-turned-animated series.

|
Gary Laughlin handles specimens at the McCrone Research Institute in Bronzeville, founded in 1960 by Walter McCrone. (WTTW News)

Walter McCrone championed the light microscope — and used it to analyze art world treasures and frauds. The late scientist is featured in the recently released Netflix documentary series “This Is a Robbery” and appeared years ago on WTTW’s “The New Explorers.”

|
The Duke of Hastings and Daphne Bridgerton are the subject of much gossip in the Netflix series "Bridgerton." (Netflix / Facebook)

Find out what the hit Netflix series gets right — and wrong — about gossip in the 1800s when Newberry Library scholars host a lighthearted virtual chat this week.

|
Lily Collins as the titular Emily in “Emily in Paris.” (Netflix)

The kerfuffle involving a fictional character insulting Lou Malnati’s, by name, has earned national attention. 

|
Phil Rosenthal, left, digs into peach cobbler and ice cream during the Chicago episode of "Somebody Feed Phil." (Courtesy of Shawn Michelle's Ice Cream)

Chicago’s restaurant scene has been hit hard during the coronavirus pandemic. A new episode of the Netflix series “Somebody Feed Phil,” which filmed in the city in 2019, serves as a reminder of why these businesses are worth saving.

|
In this Dec. 9, 2019, file photo, former first lady Michelle Obama listens to female students at the Can Giuoc high school in Long An province, Vietnam.  (AP Photo / Hau Dinh, File)

The film, described as “an intimate look into the life of former first lady Michelle Obama” chronicles her 34-city book tour in 2018-2019 for her best-selling memoir “Becoming.” 

|
(Netflix)

“Tiger King” has become a streaming sensation during the coronavirus pandemic, but accredited zoos and aquariums aren’t entertained by the unsavory practices on display.

|
Ava DuVernay, center, is joined by Antron McCray, Raymond Santana, Kevin Richardson, Korey Wise and Yusef Salaam, of the Central Park Five, during arrivals of the 71st Primetime Emmy Awards on Sunday, Sept. 22, 2019, at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

Chicago-based Reid & Associates claims the popular series about the Central Park Five defames the company's interrogation technique.

|
Chicago-based writer and director Joe Swanberg appears on “Chicago Tonight.”

Chicago-based writer and director Joe Swanberg has been shooting “Easy” in Chicago for the past three years. He tells us about the central theme of the show – and the role the city plays.

|
This combination photo shows rappers, from left, Chance the Rapper, Cardi B and T.I., who will work as judges in a new Netflix competition series looking for the next big hip-hop star. (AP Photo)

Cardi B, Chance the Rapper and T.I. will work as judges in a new Netflix competition series looking for the next big hip-hop star.

|
(Gilles Mingasson / Netflix)

With 20 million American women and 10 million men expected to suffer from an eating disorder sometime in their lives, some are concerned the film could serve as a blueprint.

|
(dailyinvention / Flickr)

New ways of producing, distributing and consuming TV shows means consumers no longer have to rush home to catch a scheduled broadcast.

,
|
The Netflix series “13 Reasons Why” follows the fictional story of Hannah Baker. (13 Reasons Why / Facebook)

It’s a TV show everyone is talking about, but with suicide a leading cause of death among youth, mental health experts are concerned about the message “13 Reasons Why” is sending.

|

One of Steven Avery’s defense attorneys from Netflix’s “Making a Murderer” discusses his new book “Illusion of Justice.”

|
Brendan Dassey (Tracy Symonds-Keogh / Wikimedia Commons)

Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel announced Friday he has filed a notice to appeal a federal judge’s decision to overturn Brendan Dassey’s murder conviction, a case documented in the Netflix series “Making a Murderer.”

|
Footage from the interrogation of Brendan Dassey, as seen in the Netflix documentary “Making a Murderer.” (Courtesy Netflix)

Brendan Dassey, whose confession to involvement in the murder of Teresa Halbach was depicted in the wildly popular Netflix documentary series “Making a Murderer,” may be released from prison by Thanksgiving. We hear from his post-trial attorney on the judge's ruling.