“Latinos in Chicago: Quest for a Political Voice” by Wilfredo Cruz.

In his book “Latinos in Chicago: Quest for a Political Voice” author Wilfredo Cruz plumbs the history of Chicago’s Latino communities as they carved out a place for themselves in the city’s rough and tumble political climate. 

Film poster for “Punch 9 for Harold Washington.”
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In many ways, the story of Mayor Harold Washington’s rise to City Hall is distinctly Chicagoan. But the makers of the documentary “Punch 9 for Harold Washington,” say his election had reverberations far beyond the city’s borders.

“Punch 9 for Harold Washington” explores the life and legacy of the historic mayor who, as the city's first Black Mayor, faced racism on a daily basis. (Courtesy Tallgrass Films)

The story of Chicago’s first Black mayor is one of several documentaries hitting the big screen at the Chicago International Film Festival. “Punch 9 for Harold Washington” explores the life and legacy of the historic mayor who, as the city’s first Black mayor, faced racism on a daily basis.

Chicago Mayor Harold Washington speaks during the commissioning of the nuclear-powered attack submarine USS Chicago in September 1986 in Norfolk, Virginia. (The U.S. National Archives)
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The Chicago Public Library has filled a gap in the legacy of former Mayor Harold Washington by digitizing scores of his written speeches, available to the public in a searchable online collection, library officials announced this week.

A bust of Jean Baptiste Pointe DuSable. (Wikimedia Commons)

Development of DuSable Park, stalled for more than 30 years, is finally inching forward. Advocates say Jean Baptiste Pointe DuSable set an example for multicultural harmony we’ve yet to follow.

On this date, 35 years ago, “Chicago Tonight” was born. Watch the premiere episode, featuring an interview with John Callaway and Mayor Harold Washington.

Chicago Mayor Harold Washington speaks during the commissioning of the nuclear-powered attack submarine USS Chicago in September 1986 in Norfolk, Virginia.

As we approach the 30th anniversary of his death, a discussion about the legacy of former Chicago Mayor Harold Washington with local filmmaker Joe Winston and former news anchor Robin Robinson.

(Courtesy of N’DIGO)

From the obvious game changers to the surprising—and controversial—a new book by the publisher of N’DIGO profiles the biggest Chicago icons.

Whether it was dancing with a polka queen or meeting with protesters, Mayor Harold Washington was always smiling. We celebrate Chicago’s first and so far only African-American mayor with the signature drink, How’s Harold?

Nearly 30 years after his death, the “People’s Mayor” Harold Washington is being honored with a daylong summit, and registration is filling up fast. Paula Thornton Greear with the Chicago Urban League says remembering Washington’s legacy is essential, especially given today’s political climate. 

David Adjaye

“Buildings can transform. They can change places. They can change the perception of places." That was architect David Adjaye’s message to a group of about 20 community leaders he met with on Tuesday at the DuSable Museum of African American History.

As the city grapples with issues of race and equality in the wake of the Laquan McDonald video, today marks the 28th anniversary of the death of Chicago’s first African-American mayor, Harold Washington.

In celebration of our 30th anniversary, we revisit John Callaway’s interview with Harold Washington on April 24, 1984—the very first episode of “Chicago Tonight.”

Chicago’s premiere live, nightly news program turns 30 today. We look back at the inaugural show and 30 years of keeping you connected with the city and its community.  

On Chicago Tonight’s 29th birthday, travel back to April 24, 1984 to watch our very first episode.

We take a look at the political career and legacy of Chicago's first African-American mayor, Harold Washington.