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Chicago’s popular 606 elevated trail. (WTTW News)

Chicago’s popular 606 trail has led to skyrocketing property values in the surrounding area. Several aldermen now say they want to hit pause on some development because it’s leading to displacement of longtime residents. But the plan has its critics.

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(Steven Vance / Flickr)

A Chicago bus driver who was fired after running over a cyclist in River North in June racked up more than 532 hours of overtime in 2019 – including on the day of that nonfatal crash, according to records obtained by WTTW News.

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(WTTW News)

The Chicago Department of Transportation on Thursday acknowledged the frustrations cyclists have faced when submitting bicycle-related issues to 311, but said the system has been improving and called on everyone to keep those service requests coming.

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(WTTW News)

With hundreds of miles of bike lanes, Chicago is touted as a city for cyclists. But many who ride on city streets say the daily hazards they encounter and report aren’t being addressed.

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Four years ago, Argyle Street in Uptown was dramatically reimagined. How the single-level streetscape, now permanent, is working – and whether it can serve as a model in other neighborhoods.

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A Divvy docking station in the Chicago’s West Loop. (Tony Webster / Flickr)

This week the popular transportation app Transit announced Lyft was blocking users from accessing rides on New York’s bike-sharing system. But Chicagoans who use Transit to access Divvy bikes need not worry. 

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(Ken Teegardin / Flickr)

A CTA bus operator who was fired after an on-duty accident in which he struck a cyclist was among the highest-paid drivers working for the agency in recent years, according to a WTTW News analysis of CTA employee salaries.

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A Chicago Department of Transportation rendering shows what a new bike lane configuration on Dickens Avenue would look like.

A proposal to add a so-called greenway for cyclists and introduce pedestrian-focused safety measures on a Lincoln Park side street has sparked an outpouring of attention from neighbors.

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A view of Wells Street looking south to the intersection of Hubbard Street in River North, where  police say a cyclist and CTA bus collided on June 6, 2019. (Google Maps)

A Chicago Transit Authority bus driver who racked up more than a dozen traffic tickets before working at the agency is out of a job and facing a lawsuit, along with his former employer, following a nonfatal June crash that sent a Chicago cyclist to the hospital.

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Chicago and the world is on the brink of a transportation revolution – and activists for racial equity want to ensure the benefits of that revolution reach communities of color.

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Fort Collins, Colorado residents Bob Houser (from left) and Bob Falkenberg are cycling across the country with Washington, D.C. resident Annie Lipsitz to raise funds for Be the Match, a nonprofit that helps patients who need bone marrow or umbilical cord transplants. (Bob Houser / Facebook)

A trio of cyclists who have been touched by leukemia are traveling across the country to raise money and awareness for Be the Match, a nonprofit that helps patients who need bone marrow or umbilical cord blood transplants. 

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A view of Wells Street looking south to the intersection of Hubbard Street in River North, where  police say a cyclist and CTA bus collided on June 6, 2019. (Google Maps)

A bicyclist was struck by a CTA bus in the 400 block of North Wells Street on Thursday morning, according to the Chicago Police Department.

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Shedd Aquarium’s Kayak for Conservation program aims to introduce residents to the Chicago River ecosystem and the wildlife that call the waters home. (Hilary Wind / Shedd Aquarium)

Chicago summers are nature’s way of rewarding your winter survival skills. And now that warm weather is here, it’s time to get off the couch and actively embrace the season. Here are 10 fun, easy ways to do just that.

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(Rahm Emanuel / Facebook)

The former Chicago mayor completed the more than 900-mile trip Tuesday, according to a post on Facebook.

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After two years of construction, a highly anticipated change to Chicago’s Lakefront Trail is now a reality: separate paths for cyclists and pedestrians. But it may take some getting used to.

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A Divvy docking station in the Chicago’s West Loop. (Tony Webster / Flickr)

A new study found that Evanston residents were generally accepting of bike-share programs like Divvy, while residents in Humboldt Park viewed such programs as signs of privilege and gentrification. 

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