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On Sunday, PBS airs part one of a sweeping new four-part documentary on the life and legacy of Muhammad Ali. (PBS / Florentine Films)

He was bigger than boxing and larger than life — a true icon of the 20th century. Filmmaker Ken Burns and Donald Lassere of the Chicago History Museum join us to discuss the sweeping new four-part documentary on the life and legacy of Muhammad Ali.

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(Courtesy the estate of Vivian Maier)

When she died 12 years ago, photographer Vivian Maier went from anonymous to fairly famous. Now the onetime North Shore nanny is receiving more posthumous praise, this time for a show of her mostly unseen color photographs of local people and places. 

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The Chicago History Museum (WTTW News)

After helming the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville for many years, the South Side native has returned to the city to lead the Chicago History Museum. Donald Lassere joins us to talk about expanding the museum’s mission to all of Chicago. 

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(Will Clayton / Flickr)

Chicago was incorporated as a city March 4, 1837, the same day Martin Van Buren was inaugurated president. What else happened in 1837? Turns out, a lot.

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Chicago Sun-Times photographers, 1956. (Courtesy the Chicago History Museum)

Journalism, we often hear, is a “first draft of history.” That makes old newspaper photos an excellent window into the past. We get a peek.

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An exhibit at the Chicago History Museum highlights the experiences of Muslims in Chicago through audio interviews, photographs, videos, artwork, maps and everyday objects. We go for a look.

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Martha Bárcena, Mexico’s ambassador to the U.S., appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2019.

Bárcena, who last year became the first woman to hold her position, discusses immigration and the political relationship between the U.S. and Mexico. 

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From left: Evening dress designs by Howard Greer; Jacques, Chicago; and Jenkins. (Courtesy Chicago History Museum)

The 1930s were a defining decade for the U.S. At the Chicago History Museum, a new exhibit explores part of that era’s history you might not think of: fashion.

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Lonnie Bunch appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Thursday, June 20, 2019.

The former head of the Chicago Historical Society, who created the Smithsonian’s African American history museum, is now running the Smithsonian itself – and is here to talk about it.

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Wall clock designed by George Stephens and made by the Hammond Clock Company, Chicago, 1938. (Chicago History Museum)

A look at Chicago’s historical influence on an enduring design style. Plus, overlooked graphic art made by African-American designers.

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For 45 year, Studs Terkel took WFMT radio listeners along for an amazing and crazy ride. Now, thousands of hours of his radio show are being digitized and posted online for free.

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Chicago History Museum curator Joy Bivins

What does race mean to you? A new exhibit at the Chicago History Museum asks visitors to consider how much all of us focus on race every day, whether we realize it or not.

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The Chicago History Museum partnered with Alan Rhodes to present historical events like the Valentine's Day Massacre through virtual and augmented reality. (Courtesy of Chicago History Museum)

Last fall, 21st century technology was used to tell the story of a 20th century tragedy: the Eastland Disaster. The team behind that project is set to launch a second installment of its augmented reality app. Learn more.

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A remarkable new app brings us face-to-face with the 1915 Chicago tragedy.

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The Chicago History Museum has a whole slew of Abraham Lincoln memorabilia. But until now, at least one item – Lincoln’s family carriage – had not been on display since 1986. See it and the president’s deathbed starting Saturday.

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The head of the Chicago History Museum talks about the ups and downs facing museums today, plus his school days with Hillary Clinton  and why he "binge listens" to Studs Terkel.