Thanks to our sponsors:

View all sponsors

|

Gov. J.B. Pritzker takes the helm, and a date for early voting in Chicago is set. Political reporters Carol Marin, Paris Schutz and Amanda Vinicky have those stories and more in this week’s roundtable.

|

You don’t have to wait till election day to cast a ballot. On Jan. 28, early voting will start at the city’s downtown “super site.” Find out when and where you can cast your ballot.

|

Defensive words from City Council members who have proposed a flurry of reforms in the wake of the Ald. Ed Burke scandal. Political reporters Carol Marin and Paris Schutz dive into that story and more in this week’s roundtable.

|
Ald. Ricardo Munoz, 22nd Ward (Chicago Tonight file photo)

Ald. Ricardo Munoz is facing domestic abuse charges, and the field of candidates for Chicago mayor is narrowing. Political reporters Paris Schutz and Amanda Vinicky have those stories and more in this week’s roundtable.

|

Catch up on what you may have missed over the holidays – and get a look at what’s to come in 2019 – with our political correspondents in this weekly roundtable.

|

A major detente in the race for Chicago mayor. We take a deep dive into the 2019 election and other top political headlines in our weekly roundtable.

|
“Toni Preckwinkle is doing what a party boss does,” mayoral candidate Lori Lightfoot said Monday, Dec. 17, 2018.

Election officials and campaigns are in a frenzy to sort out who will be on the mayoral ballot in February, and things likely won’t let up until well into the new year.

|

The race for Chicago mayor is intensifying and the feuding among candidates has begun. We take a deep dive into the 2019 municipal election and other top political headlines in our weekly roundtable.

A ‘Chicago Tonight’ Exclusive

|
Ald. Marty Quinn, 13th Ward, speaks with “Chicago Tonight” on Dec. 10, 2018.

David Krupa, a 19-year-old aldermanic candidate, alleges election fraud as he tries to take on Ald. Marty Quinn, a top ally of Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan, in the 13th Ward.

|
A photograph of a shelter dog from our story, “Photographer Donates His Talents to Help Dogs Get Adopted.” (Courtesy Josh Feeney)

Fix Chicago 2019 aims to end the killing of shelter pets in Chicago. The first task of the new group? Taking inventory of where candidates running for city office stand on various animal welfare issues. 

|
“I’m proud to receive the support of the Chicago Teachers Union, of SEIU Healthcare, of SEIU 73,” said Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle on Thursday, Dec. 6, 2018.

Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle secures a mayoral endorsement from the Chicago Teachers Union as candidates stake out positions on an elected CPS board. 

|

A lesser-known mayoral candidate wins a lottery to get the top spot on February’s ballot. We take a deep dive into that and other top political headlines in our new weekly feature.

|
In this May 4, 2011 file photo, Chicago Ald. Ed Burke speaks at a City Council meeting. (AP Photo / M. Spencer Green, File)

Powerful Ald. Ed Burke, who is under federal scrutiny, holds a fundraiser as mayoral candidates start to distance themselves from the embattled chair of the City Council Finance Committee.

|

Candidates for Chicago mayor have now officially entered the rough and tumble part of the contest, and Illinois Comptroller Susana Mendoza says other campaigns are trying to silence her voice.

|
Ald. Ed Burke speaks to “Chicago Tonight” and other media after returning to his home on the Southwest Side on Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018. Earlier in the day, federal agents conducted a raid on his offices. (Brian Cassella / Chicago Tribune via AP)

As powerful Ald. Ed Burke deals with fallout from the federal raid on his city and ward offices, four candidates have quietly lined up bids to try and unseat him in the 14th Ward.

|
State Rep. La Shawn Ford is among those hoping to be Chicago’s next mayor.

Candidates aiming to be Chicago’s next mayor had until 5 p.m. Monday to turn in the paperwork that will get them on the ballot – paperwork that includes the signatures of at least 12,500 registered Chicago voters.