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Jonathon Solomon, left, of the James R. Thompson Center Historical Society introduces his group at the start of their public tour. (Evan Garcia / WTTW News)

The state says the building is too expensive to maintain and repair, but architectural activists are determined to highlight its unique features and its role in the city’s past, present and future.

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(Ken Lund / Flickr)

The 17-story, curved-glass structure opened in May 1985 to house state offices. Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed a measure in April authorizing the sale of the building, which has been hailed for its architecture but derided for its functionality. 

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(Ken Lund / Flickr)

The James R. Thompson Center has been controversial since it landed in the Loop in 1985. Now, a new layer of controversy has been added to the building’s history: its potential sale.

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“It’s a difficult day for us, but we will get through it,” an emotional Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said Tuesday following the shooting death of 18th District Commander Paul Bauer.

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Senate Minority Leader Christine Radogno and House Minority Leader Jim Durkin filed legislation that would direct future property tax receipts from a possible Thompson Center redevelopment to Chicago Public Schools. (Ken Lund / Flickr)

Gov. Bruce Rauner says property taxes generated from the sale of the James R. Thompson Center could top $45 million per year, and Republican-backed legislation introduced Friday would send every one of those dollars to Chicago Public Schools.

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(Ken Lund / Flickr)

What does the future hold for Helmut Jahn’s 16-story Loop office building?

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(Photos courtesy Preservation Chicago)

Preservation Chicago has released its annual list of the most endangered buildings in Chicago, a list they usually call “the Chicago Seven” – but for the first time in 14 years, the organization has included an eighth structure.

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While a monthslong architecture celebration underway in Chicago, there are some big changes in store for the city’s architectural landscape. We discuss the planned and potential changes to the city’s skyline with Lee Bey, host of Rivet Radio’s Architecture360; and architect and author Edward Keegan. 

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The Thompson Center is for sale. Gov. Rauner says the iconic building has become a costly and inefficient albatross for Illinois. Just how much can the state get for it, and what does the renowned architect who designed it have to say about its future?

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Hoping to make some progress on pension reform before next week's special session, Governor Quinn calls a meeting with the General Assembly's legislative leaders. Paris Schutz has the latest from their meeting. 

Imagining the Thompson Center as a Casino

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The Thompson Center could be transformed into a casino -- and city labor and business leaders are buzzing. An architecture critic weighs in.

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