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Wilmette resident Bill Bucklew, right, ran in the Berlin marathon on Sept. 29. Bucklew, who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease at 43, will run in the Chicago marathon on Sunday, Oct. 13. (Courtesy of Bill Bucklew)

The Oct. 13 race is just one of six marathons Bill Bucklew is running in single a year to raise funds for Parkinson’s disease. The 49-year-old was diagnosed with the progressive neurological disorder seven years ago. 

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(Krzysztof Kamil / Pixabay)

If you wake up in the middle of the night and start browsing social media or turn on the TV, you might have difficulty falling back asleep or feel groggy later on, but your sleep-wake cycle should remain intact, according to a new Northwestern University study.

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In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. (AP Photo / Francisco Seco, File)

People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more likely to develop dementia versus those with low genetic risk and good habits, researchers reported Sunday. 

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(Courtesy Northwestern University)

Neil Shubin, University of Chicago paleontologist and one of our favorite explainers of all things scientific, joins us to discuss stories making news in the world of science.

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If you want to save your brain, focus on keeping the rest of your body well with exercise and healthy habits rather than popping vitamin pills, new guidelines for preventing dementia advise.

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In this April 29, 2019 photo provided by the University of Kentucky, Dr. Peter T. Nelson inspects a section of brain in the neuropathology lab at the Sanders-Brown Center for Aging in Lexington, Kentucky (Mark Cornelison / University of Kentucky via AP)

Some people told they have Alzheimer’s may instead have a newly identified mimic of the disease — and scientists say even though neither is yet curable, it’s critical to get better at telling different kinds of dementia apart.

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(sabinevanerp / Pixabay)

New research suggests seniors who aren’t on guard against scams also might be at risk for eventually developing Alzheimer’s disease.

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(SharonMcCutcheon / Pixabay)

New imaging techniques will allow researchers to study small changes in the retina that could indicate the early stages of brain diseases, like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

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(StockSnap / Pixabay)

Northwestern University is one of dozens of medical centers across the country studying whether the drug can protect against or slow down the progression of the disease in patients already experiencing symptoms.

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 (stevepb / Pixabay)

There is no definitive test to diagnosis the progressive neurodegenerative disease. But that could change, thanks to new research that was able to accurately detect ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases using graphene.

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(Monlaw / Pixabay)

A new study links higher levels of key nutrients associated with the Mediterranean diet to more efficient brain connectivity and performance on cognitive tests in older adults. 

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Band-Aid-like wearable shunt monitor, as seen on woman's neck. (Courtesy of Northwestern University)

More than 1 million Americans live with brain shunts and the constant threat of their failure, which can be fatal. A new, noninvasive skin sensor can detect whether a shunt is working in minutes.

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(KeithJJ / Pixabay)

A gene associated with the learning disorder dyslexia may make some athletes less susceptible to concussions, according to a new study by Northwestern Medicine and Penn State University.

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(Marco Verch / Flickr)

A common but preventable gum infection may facilitate the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study by the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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Research conducted by auditory neuroscientists at Northwestern University reveals that studying how the brain processes sound could provide an objective way to diagnose concussions. 

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(stevepb / Pixabay)

In the last two decades, only four drugs have been approved to treat Alzheimer’s symptoms, according to a new report. “I’m very optimistic that within 10 years we’ll have a breakthrough,” said Dr. Doug Williamson of biopharmaceutical company Lundebeck.

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