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Band-Aid-like wearable shunt monitor, as seen on woman's neck. (Courtesy of Northwestern University)

More than 1 million Americans live with brain shunts and the constant threat of their failure, which can be fatal. A new, noninvasive skin sensor can detect whether a shunt is working in minutes.

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(KeithJJ / Pixabay)

A gene associated with the learning disorder dyslexia may make some athletes less susceptible to concussions, according to a new study by Northwestern Medicine and Penn State University.

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(Marco Verch / Flickr)

A common but preventable gum infection may facilitate the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study by the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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Research conducted by auditory neuroscientists at Northwestern University reveals that studying how the brain processes sound could provide an objective way to diagnose concussions. 

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(stevepb / Pixabay)

In the last two decades, only four drugs have been approved to treat Alzheimer’s symptoms, according to a new report. “I’m very optimistic that within 10 years we’ll have a breakthrough,” said Dr. Doug Williamson of biopharmaceutical company Lundebeck.

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Speakers at The Atlantic’s “Disrupting Alzheimer’s” event on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018. (Kristen Thometz / Chicago Tonight)

Despite the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease, researchers, caregivers and advocates are optimistic about the future. “I see a treatment, it’s going to happen,” said William Klein, a professor at Northwestern University.  

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(cegoh / Pixabay)

New guidelines recommend youth who have experienced a concussion return to non-sports activities sooner than previously advised because it can aid in the recovery process.

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The PKG provides clinicians with objective measurements of Parkinson’s symptoms. (Courtesy of Global Kinetics Corporation)

Treating the progressive degenerative disease can be difficult. Researchers are hoping a wearable device can provide clinicians with more objective data to inform their treatment decisions.

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Left: Sunrise over Lake Michigan. (rlobes / Pixabay). Right: Moon over Chicago. (nathanmac87 / Flickr)

The adage, “early to bed early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise,” takes on new meaning thanks to research by scientists in Chicago and England.

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(Elliott Abel / Shirley Ryan AbilityLab)

While inpatient settings help stroke victims recover, their progress tends to decline when they return home. Researchers are hoping that a new breed of wearable electronics could curb that drop-off in recovery.

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(Courtesy Dominican University)

Two Chicago-area researchers have uncovered what they think is the first piece of physical evidence showing that forgotten memories could still live on inside our brains.

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(Uncorked Adventures NFP / Facebook)

Bill Bucklew walked more than 2,500 miles across the country in two months to raise funds and awareness for Parkinson’s disease. “I have a whole range of emotions right now,” he said upon walking his final mile.

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A downy woodpecker (RaechelJ / Pixabay)

Football players are often thought of as modern-day gladiators, but even the most hard-headed linebacker has nothing on the woodpecker, at least when it comes to sustaining blows to the noggin. 

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Men are less likely to develop multiple sclerosis than women, and now scientists have a better understanding as to why that is, thanks to the discovery of a “guardian molecule” by Northwestern University scientists. 

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(Pixabay)

Nearly seven years after former Chicago Bears safety Dave Duerson took his own life, a bill bearing his name will aim to prevent the disease that is believed to have led to his suicide.

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Researchers have created a tool that can predict language learning in deaf children after they receive a cochlear implant. Prediction is just the first step, says Dr. Nancy Young. “We’re trying to create precision therapy.”