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A public service message reading Stay Home Saves Lives is seen against the Chicago skyline Monday, March 30, 2020. (AP Photo/ Charles Rex Arbogast)

Democratic lawmakers are calling out an apparent lack of racial data that they say is needed to monitor and address disparities in the national response to the coronavirus outbreak.

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President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Briefing Room, Monday, March 23, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo / Alex Brandon)

Illinois state Rep. Theresa Mah (D-Chicago) says some constituents are telling her they’re afraid of racist repercussions because of President Donald Trump’s insistence on using the phrase “Chinese virus.”

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(WTTW News)

Gov. J.B. Pritzker announced a stay-at-home order for the entire state just a few days ago, but there are already concerns over how it will be enforced – particularly in communities of color.

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(Martijn / Flickr)

More and more states are legalizing marijuana, but the number of women involved in the cannabis industry keeps dropping. What can Chicago do to buck that trend?

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 Journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones appears on “Chicago Tonight.” (WTTW News)

This year, the U.S. marks the 400th year since the Pilgrims arrived. But the year before that, a much darker period began with the sailing of the White Lion. We speak with New York Times Magazine journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones about The 1619 Project.

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Senn High School (Wikimedia Commons)

The teacher who was accused by a Hispanic student of telling her to “go back to your country” after she refused to stand for the pledge of allegiance has been removed from the school.

Female student said teacher told her to “go back to your country”

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Senn High School (Wikimedia Commons)

Students inside a North Side high school staged a sit-in Wednesday following allegations that a school staffer told a female student to “go back to (your) country” after she refused to stand for the pledge of allegiance.

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The Pilsen post office at 1859 S. Ashland Ave., Chicago. (WTTW News)

Community leaders are pushing the postal service for answers – and changes – after a customer reported a clerk who refused to help Spanish-speaking customers.

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Rep. Karen Kwan, D- Murray, center, speaks during the ERA Now rally at the Utah State Capitol during the first day of the Utah legislative session Monday, Jan. 27, 2020, in Salt lake City. (AP Photo / Rick Bowmer)

The lawsuit filed against the archivist of the United States comes after the National Archives and Records Administration said this week that David Ferriero would “take no action to certify the adoption of the Equal Rights Amendment.” 

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Paul Adams III appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Jan. 20, 2020. (WTTW News)

Martin Luther King Jr. was known for speaking out against racial segregation, voter disenfranchisement and economic inequality. We discuss his life and legacy with a man who marched with him: Paul Adams III.

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(WTTW News)

Women take to the streets across the country just as Virginia passes the Equal Rights Amendment. What’s the future of the ERA?

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(WTTW News)

Last year, 86% of the nearly 490,000 traffic stops made by Chicago police involved a driver of color, according to the ACLU of Illinois. Of those, 300,000 stops involved a black driver.

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Naperville Central High School (Google Maps)

A suburban Chicago 14-year-old faces hate crime and other charges for allegedly posting on Craigslist a picture of an African American classmate with the caption, “Slave for sale.”

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The city of Anna. (Whitney Curtis, special to ProPublica Illinois)

The term “sundown town” is familiar to many African Americans. A new ProPublica Illinois story examines the legacy of one sundown town in Southern Illinois named Anna.

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Justin Vahl of Montgomery, Illinois and his wife, Mary, right, speak during a press conference Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019 about how he was asked to move at a Buffalo Wild Wings restaurant in Naperville because a nearby couple didn't want to sit near blacks. (Paul Valade / Daily Herald via AP)

An attorney representing a group of black customers who say they were asked to change tables at a Chicago-area Buffalo Wild Wings because of their skin color urged the restaurant chain Tuesday to make wholesale changes to avoid a discrimination lawsuit.

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Author Celeste Watkins-Hayes appears on “Chicago Tonight.”

For more than a decade, Northwestern University professor Celeste Watkins-Hayes documented the lives of more than 100 women living with HIV/AIDS in Chicago and beyond. Now, their stories are featured in a new book.

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