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Mark Larson (Photo © Sarah Elizabeth Larson)

Mark Larson’s encyclopedic new book chronicles the development of a unique artistic movement in Chicago through the voices of more than 300 actors, directors, designers, writers, choreographers and producers. 

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A viewer’s photo of her mother at a glamorous restaurant in 1940s Chicago left her wondering where the photo was taken. And we finally address an elephant in the room at Marshall Field’s.

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The Pilsen neighborhood has been at the center of battles over gentrification. Now the longtime Mexican American community is facing a new twist involving old buildings.

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(Courtesy Chicago Public Library)

As real estate development booms in pockets of the city, it feels like a new neighborhood is introduced every few months. This may seem like a relatively recent phenomenon, but in Chicago, the practice goes back decades. Geoffrey Baer explains.

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This file photo shows Indiana Reformatory booking shots of John Dillinger, stored in the state archives, and shows the notorious gangster as a 21-year-old. (AP Photo / The Indianapolis Star, Charlie Nye, File)

Descendants of the notorious Depression-era bank robber claim they have evidence that the body in his grave in Indiana may not be his. We examine the enduring fascination with the legendary outlaw.

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To truly appreciate the charm of a terra-cotta lavished building, Chicago author and photographer Lee Bey says to put on your gym shoes and go for a walk. We join him for a look at some of the city’s early architecture.

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The South Shore Drill Team at the Bud Billiken Parade in 2015. (Daniel X. O'Neil / Flickr)

Every second weekend in August, a stretch of Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in Bronzeville is taken over by one of the largest parades in the country. We talk legacy and tradition with parade organizer Myiti Sengstacke-Rice.

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President Ronald Reagan in the press box with Harry Caray during a Chicago Cubs and Pittsburgh Pirates baseball game at Wrigley Field in Chicago on Sept. 30, 1988.

The longtime White Sox and Cubs broadcaster is the subject of a new book. Author Dan Zminda joins us to discuss “The Legendary Harry Caray: Baseball’s Greatest Salesman.”

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St. Mary of the Angels (Credit: Archdiocese of Chicago’s Joseph Cardinal Bernardin Archives and Records Center)

When driving along the Kennedy Expressway, you may have noticed massive churches that seem to almost line up with the curves and bends of the highway. Geoffrey Baer explains.

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Eve Ewing appears on “Chicago Tonight.”

A new book by local poet and sociologist Eve L. Ewing investigates the legacy of the 1919 Chicago race riots through poetry, blending verse with historical text and archival photos.

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The 1915 tragedy that left more than 800 people dead in downtown Chicago is the subject of a new documentary. Meet the producers of “Eastland: Chicago’s Deadliest Day.”

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The Ford Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. McArthur Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation are buying the archive for $30 million as part of an auction to pay off secured creditors of Johnson Publishing Company.

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The Chicago race riots of 1919 (Courtesy of the Chicago Defender)

Saturday marks the 100th anniversary of the Chicago race riots. How some local organizations are planning to remember that violent week in 1919.

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In this 1919 photo provided by Chicago History Museum, a crowd of men and armed National Guard stand in front of the Ogden Cafe during race riots in Chicago. (Chicago History Museum / The Jun Fujita negatives collection via AP)

America in the summer of 1919 ran red with blood from racial violence, and yet today, 100 years later, not many people know it even happened. It was branded “Red Summer” because of the bloodshed and amounted to some of the worst white-on-black violence in U.S. history.

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(Pranav Bhatt / Flickr)

A new documentary from Chicago’s Kartemquin Films revisits an extreme weather event that killed more than 700 people – most of them poor and black. We discuss “Cooked: Survival by Zip Code” with producer Fenell Doremus.

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The Chicago Huskies (Credit: Japanese American Service Committee)

A youth basketball league from the 1940s and ‘50s is a reminder of Japanese American internment during World War II. Geoffrey Baer has that story and more in this edition of Ask Geoffrey.

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