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This combination of images released by Vintage Books shows cover art for "Martita, I Remember You," left, and a portrait of author Sandra Cisneros. (Vintage Books via AP, left, and Keith Dannemiller via AP)

The author of the best-selling “The House on Mango Street” is back with her first work of fiction in almost a decade, a story of memory and friendship, but also about the experiences young women endure as immigrants worldwide.

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Wooded Island’s Japanese Garden, in spring. (Patty Wetli / WTTW News)

“I know people are upset but you can’t tell me there’s not bad activity there after dark,” Mike Kelly, CEO of the Chicago Park District, said in defense of gates the agency installed that are now at the center of another controversy brewing at Jackson Park.

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Adlai Stevenson III appears on “Chicago Tonight” in 2009 with Carol Marin. (WTTW News)

In 2009, Adlai Stevenson III spoke with Carol Marin on “Chicago Tonight.” Even though he was a self-proclaimed “reformer,” he still found virtues in the old party machinery. Stevenson died Monday at the age of 90.

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A piece of Lincoln Park's history can be found in Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve. (Patty Wetli / WTTW News)

Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve in suburban Darien is roughly 30 miles and a world away from downtown Chicago, but this is where a section of the city’s prized lakefront once rested. 

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Hampton House, the childhood home of former Black Panther Party activist Fred Hampton in Maywood. (WTTW News)

Slain activist Fred Hampton would have turned 73 years old last month, and though he was killed more than 50 years ago, his memory and legacy still loom large. Now Hampton’s son is seeking a landmark designation for the only surviving building with ties to Hampton’s activism.

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(Photo courtesy of Eduardo Cornejo / Gage Park Latinx Council)

A new outdoor exhibition in Gage Park tells the neighborhood’s history from the perspective of its residents. It’s part of a new program from the Gage Park Latinx Council that invites young people to reclaim their community’s narrative. We go for a look — and a local history lesson.

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The Cabrini-Green rowhouses stand in front of a residential tower in Chicago in 2018. (Daniel Acker / Bloomberg / Getty Images)

Nearly 30 years after “Candyman” was released, people are still daring one another to say the title character’s name in the mirror to summon this hook-wielding ghost. Some urban legends don’t die, they’re just reborn.

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Six years ago President Barack Obama named the Pullman neighborhood a national monument. And Labor Day weekend, the visitor center in the old clock tower administration building will finally open. (WTTW News)

Six years ago President Barack Obama named the Pullman neighborhood a national monument. On Labor Day weekend, a new visitor center in the century-old clock tower will finally open. Geoffrey Baer visited Pullman to get an exclusive first look.

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Jerry Harkness played for Loyola basketball from 1960-1963. (WTTW News)

Jerry Harkness was inspired by Jackie Robinson to take up the game of basketball. He ended up becoming a civil rights trailblazer in his own right.

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(WTTW News)

As Chicago inches toward the replacement of its lead service lines, officials need help identifying where those pipes are. Here’s a simple way to determine whether you’ve got lead, steel or copper lines running into your home.

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A new business in Little Village explores where Midwestern meets Mexican by combining haircuts with deep cuts. (WTTW News)

Nearly 700,000 Chicago residents claim Mexican heritage, and over the years, Mexican culture has become woven into the city’s tapestry. A new business in Little Village explores the space where the Midwest meets Mexico by combining haircuts with deep cuts.

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Pastor T.L. Barrett plays piano at his home on July 30, 2021. (WTTW News)
Older artists are getting a second chance at stardom through the efforts of a local record label tucked away in Chicago’s Little Village neighborhood. We explore the musical world of Numero Group.
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A rendering of the Wrigley Field mini triangle building from the northeast corner of Addison Street and Sheffield Avenue. (Gensler / Courtesy office of Ald. Tom Tunney)

A proposed two-story triangular DraftKings Sportsbook addition to Wrigley Field still requires a heavy lift from City Council, but the Commission on Chicago Landmarks won’t stand in the way of Cubs ownership.

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The CTA’s Red-Purple tracks have curved around the Vautravers Building in Lakeview for a century. The agency moved the building to straighten the kink in the system. (Credit: Google Street View)

If you thought your last move was a hassle, CTA has got you beat: The agency just relocated an entire building.

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The coats of arms and flourishes like bells and statuettes on the façade of the Klas Restaurant make it feel like something you’d stumble upon in a little village in Eastern Europe. (Courtesy of Chuckman’s Collection)

The Old World meets the new at a legendary Cicero restaurant that’s long served as an anchor for Chicago’s expansive Czech community. But now, its legacy is under threat.

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Frank King created the masterpiece “Gasoline Alley,” which captured the ineffable passage of life in an impermanent medium, its characters aging at the same rate as its readers, many of them based on King’s own family. His best work focused on the quiet, tender and poignant moments of life, especially those between parents and children. (Courtesy Chicago Cultural Center)

We check out a new show at the Chicago Cultural Center that makes the case that the comic strip was born and raised in Chicago. Our tour guides? Artist Chris Ware and cultural historian Tim Samuelson.