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A new novel by the New York Times bestselling author and Hyde Park resident is getting rave reviews. Rosellen Brown joins us in discussion.

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Left: Nathan Leopold, soon after his arrest. (Chicago Daily News photo courtesy of the Chicago History Museum)

In all the attempts to dissect the Leopold and Loeb story, one mystery remains unsolved: What happened to the vast bird collection that Nathan Leopold had in his Chicago home when he went to prison?

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We speak with Robin Amer, the creator of a new podcast from USA Today that takes a broad look at the events that led up to the so-called Operation Silver Shovel scandal – and the fallout that continues to this day.

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Field Museum conservation technicians Ellen Jordan and J. Kae Good Bear work on the care of cultural materials in the Regenstein Lab. (© Field Museum, photo by John Weinstein)

Many of the displays in the museum’s Native American Hall have gone unchanged since the 1950s. Now, Native American scholars and tribal members will work with the museum to “better represent” these stories.

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You want a piece of Chicago? An array of notable works of art and historic Chicago artifacts are up for auction.

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Interior of a Chicago saloon, 1905 (Chicago Daily News negatives collection / Chicago History Museum)

Visitors to the Field Museum this fall will have a chance to soak up Chicago’s rich beer history, with a focus on the immigrant communities that established the city’s first breweries.

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William Walker, “Childhood Is without Prejudice,” 1977 (Photograph by James Prigoff and Robin J. Dunitz)

Chicago has been the creative home to many unusual artists over its history. A new book looks at the big picture, from the Great Chicago Fire to the art scene of today.

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As one of Chicago’s oldest and most prestigious institutions unveils a new look, it also looks back at an event that transformed the city.

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After more than 25 years on Michigan Avenue, the cultural organization has moved into a spectacular new space on East Wacker Drive, expanding its mission and its footprint on the city.

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The zoo began with a gift of two pairs of swans from New York's Central Park, and has evolved into a world-class facility that now puts science and conservation at the heart of its mission.

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Grant Park, 1968 (Courtesy Al Lieberman)

Remembering the tumultuous 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, as captured by two local photographers.

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A demonstration on Aug. 10, 1968 in Chicago as the city prepared to host the Democratic National Convention. (David Wilson / Flickr)

A march planned for Saturday commemorating the 1968 anti-war protests held during the Democratic National Convention in Chicago will not just be a “nostalgia event,” says organizer Andy Thayer.

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What became of the Loop restaurant where Mayor Richard J. Daley had his power breakfasts? Geoffrey Baer has the story in this encore edition of “Ask Geoffrey.”

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(Courtesy of the Chicago Architectural Preservation Archive)

Construction on the Illinois Institute of Technology campus recently exposed a slice of Chicago’s buried past.

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Stacey Greene is the owner of Park Bait Shop at Montrose Harbor. (Jay Shefsky / Chicago Tonight)

Once upon a time in Chicago, so many people fished to feed their families that there were bait shops up and down the lakefront. The oldest one has been owned by the same family for 60 years.

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Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb with Judge John Caverly. (Courtesy of Chicago History Museum)

Some have called the Leopold and Loeb case “the murder that wouldn’t die.” A new book fans the flames of our obsession with this baffling and sensational crime. A conversation with author Nina Barrett.