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We revisit the story of photographer Wallace Kirkland, who started his career as a social worker at the Hull House settlement in Chicago. He took a winding path in an artistic career that led him from Jamaica to India and around the world – all the while photographing Chicago people and places. 

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We revisit our story about a Chicago artist that continues to make an impression on the city more than 25 years after he died. You may not know his name but you’ve likely seen his public art. Egon Weiner was also a teacher, and his prominent students continue his legacy. 

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The photographer Wallace Kirkland was a late bloomer who started his career as a social worker at the Hull House settlement in Chicago. He took a winding path in an artistic career that led him from Jamaica to India and around the world – all the while photographing Chicago people and places. 

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Courtesy of the Koehnline Museum of Art.

A Chicago artist continues to make an impression on the city more than 25 years after he died. You may not know his name but you’ve likely seen his public art. Egon Weiner was also a teacher, and his prominent students continue his legacy. 

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It was his 75th birthday. Hundreds attended a VIP event featuring music, belly dancers, and speakers honoring his life’s work, and the public opening of the Ed Paschke Art Center in Jefferson Park drew thousands from the neighborhood. Ed Paschke was celebrated in style. We revisit our story about the opening of the northwest side art center.

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We revisit a story of treasures created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany in an amazing setting – the restored Gilded Age mansion that houses the Driehaus Museum.

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We preview the surprisingly varied work of American artist John Singer Sargent through The Art Institute of Chicago’s permanent collection. Known as the great American portrait artist, Sargent was a prodigy whose many talents extended beyond his reputation. View a slideshow of Sargent's artwork.

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Who knew that the king of gothic cartoons came from Chicago? We visit an in-depth exhibit of Edward Gorey -- who influenced everyone from Maurice Sendak to Tim Burton -- at the Loyola University Museum of Art. View a slideshow of artwork.

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The dean of Chicago photojournalists, Art Shay, shares pictures of his beloved wife Florence, who died in 2012 after 67 years of marriage. We get a preview of the exhibit, My Florence: Photographs by Art Shay. Read an interview with Ann Nathan, a gallery owner who currently represents Shay.

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We find out what’s happening at the newly reopened Block Museum on the campus of Northwestern University, including a show of photographs by master photographer Edward Steichen and Polaroids by Andy Warhol. Watch a web extra video.

Someone Needs to Write a Play about Irv Kupcinet (Casting is Nearly Complete!)

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Remembering the great newspaper columnist Irv “Kup” Kupcinet 10 years after his death – and finding the ideal Chicago actor to portray him on stage.

Memory Play Recalls a Taboo Love Affair

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Lookingglass Theater opened their 26th season on Saturday with the deeply sensual drama, The North China Lover.

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What are some of the finest story songs by Chicago songwriters? Read the Artbeat blog.

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Newer suburban theaters may attract more critical attention, but if slow-and-steady wins the race, The Theatre of Western Springs (TWS), established in 1929, slaughters the competition. This year, they celebrate their 85th season and 500th production with a solid staging of Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut's mordant tale of a World War 2 veteran "unstuck in time."

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Photographer Wayne Miller, whose work captured life on Chicago's South Side and war in the South Pacific, died yesterday at age 94. We revisit a 2009 Artbeat Chicago special featuring Miller.

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We see some of the amazing murals scattered about the Chicago Park District's fieldhouses.

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