Stories by Evan Garcia

Emanuel’s Aldermanic Friends, Foes React to Bombshell Announcement

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel will not seek a third term. We get reaction to the news from City Council.

Web Extra, The Week in Review: Impact of Politicians’ Candid Remarks

Eddie Arruza and guests discuss the impact of politicians’ remarks.

The Week in Review: Officer Jason Van Dyke Speaks Out

Prosecutors seek to hold Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke in contempt of court. What impact will the highly anticipated case have on Mayor Emanuel’s re-election campaign? And is Cubs manager Joe Maddon on thin ice?

What’s at the Root of Chicago’s Violence? A State Lawmaker, Pastor Weigh In

State Rep. La Shawn Ford and the Rev. Anthony Williams offer their answers to Chicago’s epidemic of violence.

Chicago Considers Banning Horse-Drawn Carriages

Cathy McFadden works for Antique Coach & Carriage in Chicago. She’s operated horse-drawn carriages for 35 years.

Horse-drawn carriages have trotted along Chicago’s downtown streets for decades, but an ordinance making its way through City Council could outlaw the industry for good.

Web Extra, The Week in Review: Trump’s Mounting Legal Woes

Eddie Arruza and guests discuss President Donald Trump’s mounting legal woes and how they could impact Chicago politics.

The Week in Review: Poll Shows Uphill Battle for Rauner

A new poll shows a sizable lead in the race for governor. Juries convict two in the murder of Hadiya Pendleton. A renewed push for a Chicago casino. And a controversial acquisition for the Cubs.

Nonprofit Let South Side Buildings Languish After Receiving State Aid, Investigation Finds

The apartment complex at 7250 S. South Shore Drive was one of dozens of properties purchased by the Ohio-based Better Housing Foundation. (Google Street View)

With the stated mission of providing low-income housing, an Ohio-based nonprofit received millions in loans and tax breaks. But a Chicago Tribune investigation has uncovered a pattern of mismanagement and broken promises.

Organic Gardens in Chicago Provide Fresh Produce, Opportunities

The rooftop garden at Uncommon Ground restaurant in Edgewater. (Chicago Tonight)

Two certified organic gardens on opposite sides of the city provide benefits to the environment and nearby communities.

After Italian Tragedy, Concern for Illinois’ ‘Structurally Deficient’ Bridges

In Illinois last year, more than 2,300 bridges were classified as “structurally deficient” – including three spanning Lake Shore Drive. We talk aging infrastructure in Chicago and beyond.

What Would a US Space Force Look Like? Don’t Expect ‘Starship Troopers’

Vice President Mike Pence: “The space environment is fundamentally changed in the last generation.”

The president proposes a new branch of the military for space defense. Local experts weigh in on Space Force.

Shootings, Protests and ‘Bait Trucks’ Inflame Police-Community Tensions

Protesters pause at the 76th Street overpass on the Dan Ryan Expressway on July 7, 2018. (Matt Masterson / Chicago Tonight)

There is a strong sense of distrust between Chicago police and some of the communities they serve. How does the city repair this relationship?

The Week in Review: Violence Prompts Anger, Tears, Political Fallout

Chicago’s most violent weekend in two years prompts criticism – and more cops on the streets. Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani endorses “Jerry” McCarthy – and then Garry McCarthy – for mayor. And Sinclair Broadcasting will not have a home in Chicago.

‘Redneck Fishing’ for Flying Asian Carp on the Illinois River

Silver carp jumping into a boat. (Evan Garcia / Chicago Tonight)

Each year, self-proclaimed “rednecks” try to rid the Illinois River of Asian carp – one flying fish at a time. We visit the small town of Bath for a look.

Lake Shore Drive March: Activists to Protest Police-Involved Shootings

The Rev. Gregory Seal Livingston on July 24, 2018 announces plans for an anti-violence protest Aug. 2 along Lake Shore Drive. (Chicago Tonight)

Protesters are poised to take over Wrigleyville on Thursday. Organizers of the march are here to tell us why.

The Beatles in Evanston: A Rare Look at Northwestern’s Beatles Manuscripts

The Beatles wave to fans after arriving at Kennedy Airport in February 1964.

A local institution holds handwritten lyric sheets belonging to the biggest-selling music artists of all time. We get a peek at this collection of cultural artifacts.

Destruction of the City’s Last Waterfall Begins

A waterfall at River Park in Chicago. (Courtesy One City Films)

Chicago is losing its last waterfall. We follow up on an earlier story to see the beginning of its demolition in River Park.

Allegations of Abuse at Chicago-Area Shelters Housing Migrant Children

(Credit: Joshua Lott for ProPublica Illinois)

A ProPublica Illinois investigation uncovers allegations of abuse, inappropriate relationships and threats at nonprofit shelters housing migrant children. We speak with reporter Melissa Sanchez.

Mars Glows Bright as it Readies for Opposition, Close Approach

Mars is bright in the summer sky this week. (Credit: NASA / JPL / USGS)

For the next several days, the celestial event calendar includes some stellar highlights for observers in Chicago and around the globe.

History or Hate? Chicago’s Controversial Monuments and Street Names

Balbo Drive isn’t getting renamed anytime soon, but a stretch of Congress Parkway will be named after African-American journalist and anti-lynching activist Ida B. Wells. What else is causing controversy.

Ald. Ricardo Munoz to Retire from City Council, ‘Make Some Real Money’

Ald. Ricardo Munoz appears on “Chicago Tonight” on July 23, 2018.

He has represented Chicago’s 22nd Ward since 1993 but announced Monday he will not run for re-election. Ald. Ricardo Munoz joins us to discuss his major career move.

The Week in Review: Public Outcry Over Police-Involved Shooting

The fatal shooting of a South Shore barber sparks outrage and protests. Could the Trump-Putin summit reshape the local political landscape? And Chance the Rapper is now an emerging media mogul.

Web Extra, The Week in Review: NFL Policy and Miami Dolphins

Eddie Arruza and guests discuss the latest developments in the NFL’s national anthem policy.

Fatal Shooting Reignites Tension between Chicago Police, Community

Police and protesters clash after a fatal police-involved shooting. How can officers and community members come together?

Why Chicago is Tearing Down Its Last Waterfall

A waterfall at River Park in Chicago. (Courtesy One City Films)

At River Park on Chicago’s Northwest Side, a concrete dam standing 4 feet high is being prepped for removal. But it’s not just any dam – this happens to be the last waterfall within Chicago city limits.

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