|
(Courtesy Chicago Public Library)

As real estate development booms in pockets of the city, it feels like a new neighborhood is introduced every few months. This may seem like a relatively recent phenomenon, but in Chicago, the practice goes back decades. Geoffrey Baer explains.

|
Jonathan Kelly, co-founder of the Lawndale Pop-Up Spot. (WTTW News)

How some West Side residents are hoping to change the narrative of their community with a new safe space in the form of a museum.

|
Can Chicago eliminate deadly traffic crashes? It’s trying. (Petr Kratochvil / Public Domain Pictures)

Mayor Lori Lightfoot said the city plans to act with a sense of urgency on it’s just-announced Vision Zero safety plan, a $6 million effort to eliminate the number of traffic-induced serious injuries and deaths.

|

Since Chicago’s early days, anarchists, labor agitators and political radicals of all stripes have passed through the city. In the early 20th century, that included a legendary songwriter – and the subject of one of his most famous songs.

,
|

A group dedicated to addressing Chicago’s gun violence offers an update on what it’s learned through conversations with community members impacted by gun violence in the North and South Lawndale neighborhoods. 

|
(Pixabay)

Researchers analyzed the results of a 2015-2016 survey to assess the health of Chicago’s youngest residents in nine communities. Among their findings: widespread food insecurity and not enough physical activity.

|
Cellist Yo-Yo Ma plants a magnolia tree in Chicago’s Unity Park on June 21, 2019. (Evan Garcia / WTTW)

The Grammy-winning cellist stops in Chicago as part of his Bach Project, an ambitious tour of 36 cities across six continents to explore the common language of culture. See photos from the event.

|
A graphic rendering of the soon-to-be completed Farm on Ogden, which opens June 22. (Courtesy Chicago Botanic Garden)

A new 20,000-square-foot urban agriculture facility aims to expand job training programs and healthy food options in one of Chicago’s most troubled neighborhoods. 

|

The U.S. attorney’s office charged three people Monday with federal drug offenses for allegedly conspiring to sell synthetic cannabinoids at a West Side convenience store.

|

The 225,000-square-foot Sears and Roebuck printing facility was once described as its own city within the city of Chicago, but it’s been closed for decades—until now.

|
A group of students who participated in the M.U.S.I.C. Inc. program. (Courtesy of Sarah Dupuis)

Can the violin lower student dropout rates? A classically trained musician and a social worker think music lessons have the power to inspire change.

|

A dramatic transformation in the Lawndale Triangle, after two years of hard work. “When you sit here, you feel a sense of peace,” said one community organizer.

|
Aerial view in 2011 shows parts of North Lawndale and East Garfield Park (Ian Freimuth / Flickr)

How grassroots organizing is increasingly shaping the West Side community, which is looking to develop a shared vision for economic development.

,
|

Several South and Southwest Side communities lag behind national health and wellness benchmarks, according to a new community health survey.

|
Anthony Green, left, and his youth development coach Patrick Daniels at the UCAN headquarters in North Lawndale. (Maya Miller / Chicago Tonight)

North Lawndale native Patrick Daniels says his neighborhood is defined by more than violence, and he’s working to change that narrative at UCAN.

WBEZ reporter discusses the year she spent inside a fourth-grade classroom in North Lawndale

|
(Andrew Gill / WBEZ)

WBEZ reporter Linda Lutton spent the 2014-15 school year examining the impacts of poverty on a fourth-grade class in North Lawndale for a new story published this week. She spoke with Chicago Tonight to discuss that process.