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(beautifulcataya / Flickr)

Student editors at the newspaper covering Northwestern University have faced two waves of criticism over their coverage of protests in response to an event featuring former Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

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(StartupStockPhotos / Pixabay)

Julia Wallace, the former managing editor of the Chicago Sun-Times, talks about women in journalism in her new book, “There’s No Crying in Newsrooms: What Women Have Learned About What It Takes to Lead.”

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks about “News Tab” at the Paley Center, Friday, Oct. 25, 2019 in New York.  (AP Photo / Mark Lennihan)

The “News Tab,” a new section in the Facebook mobile app, will display headlines — and nothing else — from the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, BuzzFeed News, Business Insider and the Los Angeles Times, among others.

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New York Times reporter Megan Twohey appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Oct. 15, 2019.

In a new book, New York Times reporters Megan Twohey and Jodi Kantor detail how they uncovered allegations of sexual abuse by Harvey Weinstein. Twohey, an Evanston native, joins us in discussion.

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President Donald Trump speaks at the Values Voter Summit in Washington, Saturday, Oct. 12, 2019. (AP Photo / Manuel Balce Ceneta)

The video, which depicts a likeness of Trump shooting and stabbing opponents and members of the news media, was played during a conference held by conservative supporters of the president at his Miami golf resort last week. 

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(Pxhere.com)

The station will be off the air for two to three hours starting at 12 a.m. Tuesday as the station puts in a new transmitter and changes frequencies. If you watch WTTW stations over the air, you’ll need to rescan your TV.

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(Ken Lund / Flickr)

Police departments and divorce attorneys are collecting personal data from I-Pass users. WBEZ reporter Tony Arnold tells us how that happens – and why it’s legal.

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More business news is coming to “Chicago Tonight” starting this week. Through a partnership with Crain’s Chicago Business, we’ll offer a regular feature on the TV show every Monday through Thursday night.

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In this June 11, 2019 file photo, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders talks with reporters outside the White House in Washington.  (AP Photo / Evan Vucci, File)

Fox News said Thursday that Sanders has been hired to provide political commentary and analysis across all its properties, including Fox News Channel, Fox Business Network and the radio and podcast division.

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(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker)

A yearslong investigation by the Washington Post offers a state-by-state snapshot of the opioid crisis. What the data says about Illinois – and what the state is doing to fight back.

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The quad at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (WTTW News)

Why are some well-off parents in Chicago’s north suburbs giving up custody of their children? An investigation by ProPublica Illinois finds it may be to get college financial aid.

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The Ford Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. McArthur Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation are buying the archive for $30 million as part of an auction to pay off secured creditors of Johnson Publishing Company.

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A Chicago walking tour enters its final season of investigating the city’s corrupt past – and present. Local journalist Paul Dailing, who started the tour in 2016, join us in discussion.

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(A screenshot from Chicagodefender.com)

It’s the end of an era for the iconic black-owned newspaper that has told the stories of black America since 1905. Is there a future for The Defender – and black media in general – in this time of shrinking newsrooms?

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(Scott Stantis / Chicago Tribune)

After a decade commenting on news for the Chicago Tribune, editorial cartoonist Scott Stantis is stepping back from the daily grind. He joins us.

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(Eric Fischer / Flickr)

A federal appeals court says Chicago can no longer continue to hold impounded vehicles of drivers in debt to the city after the vehicle owner files for bankruptcy. Melissa Sanchez of ProPublica Illinois explains.

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