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Researchers model the wireless sensors on a doll, alongside a traditional monitoring system composed of electrodes and wires. (Courtesy of Northwestern University)

Soft, flexible sensors developed by Northwestern University researchers measure an infant’s vital signs and allow physical bonding between baby and parent.

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Band-Aid-like wearable shunt monitor, as seen on woman's neck. (Courtesy of Northwestern University)

More than 1 million Americans live with brain shunts and the constant threat of their failure, which can be fatal. A new, noninvasive skin sensor can detect whether a shunt is working in minutes.

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(Elliott Abel / Shirley Ryan AbilityLab)

While inpatient settings help stroke victims recover, their progress tends to decline when they return home. Researchers are hoping that a new breed of wearable electronics could curb that drop-off in recovery.

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Science catches up with science fiction as we revisit a conversation with Professor John Rogers, the inventor of epidermal electronics -- tiny, bendy computer chips that can be placed on or in the human body to monitor critical health data. Watch web extra videos.

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Science catches up with science fiction as we talk to Professor John Rogers, the inventor of epidermal electronics -- tiny, bendy computer chips that can be placed on or in the human body to monitor critical health data. Watch web extra videos.