|
William Ellinge, of Murrells Inlet, S.C., takes photos of waves crashing on the shore in Myrtle Beach, S.C., Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019, as Hurricane Dorian moves north off the coast. (Ken Ruinard / The Independent-Mail via AP)

Hurricane Dorian raked the Carolina coast with howling, window-rattling winds and sideways rain Thursday, spinning off tornadoes and knocking out power to more than 200,000 homes and businesses.

|
A family walks on a road after being rescued from the floodwaters of Hurricane Dorian, near Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas on Tuesday Sept. 3, 2019. They were rescued by volunteers who drove a bus into the floodwaters to pick them up. (AP Photo / Ramon Espinosa)

A day after the most powerful hurricane on record ever to hit the country finished mauling the islands of Abaco and Grand Bahama, emergency workers had yet to reach some stricken areas.

|
Cars sit submerged in water from Hurricane Dorian in Freeport, Bahamas on Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019. (AP Photo / Ramon Espinosa)

Hurricane Dorian pounded away at the Bahamas for a day and a half, devastating thousands of homes, trapping people and crippling hospitals. Atmospheric scientist Scott Collis of Argonne National Laboratory weighs in.

|
In this file photo dated Thursday, July 25, 2019, a bird sits on a straw bale on a field in Frankfurt, Germany, as the sun rises during an ongoing heatwave in Europe. (AP Photo / Michael Probst, FILE)

July was the hottest month measured on Earth since records began in 1880, the latest in a long line of peaks that scientists say backs up predictions for man-made climate change.

|
Spring flooding in Illinois (Courtesy Illinois Farm Bureau)

A trade war with China. Springtime floods. And now weeks without rain have combined to create a perfect storm battering Illinois farmers. Will a disaster declaration be enough to save them?

|
(Jonathan Babb / Wikimedia Commons)

The move comes in the wake of near-record levels of flooding this spring that forced farmers to delay planting crops. 

|
Axhi, a grizzly bear at Brookfield Zoo, enjoys a 300-pound block of ice. (Kelly Tone / Chicago Zoological Society)

As a heat wave moved across the Chicago area last week, polar and grizzly bears stayed cool at the zoo with fruit-filled blocks of ice weighing 300 pounds.

|
(g. p. / Pixabay)

Pools are a popular way to beat the heat during the summer months, but a new federal report warns of the dangers they pose to children. 

|
A roofer works on a new home under construction Thursday, July 18, 2019, in Houston. A heat wave is expected to send temperatures soaring close to 100 degrees through the weekend across much of the country. (AP Photo / David J. Phillip)

Public housing officials in Chicago were planning well-being checks on residents as the heat and humidity are expected to mount to dangerous levels.

|

It is possible to keep your garden alive when the weather shifts from extreme rain to extreme heat? The Chicago Botanic Garden’s Eliza Fournier has some tips for combatting common problems.

,
|
(Pranav Bhatt / Flickr)

A new documentary from Chicago’s Kartemquin Films revisits an extreme weather event that killed more than 700 people – most of them poor and black. We discuss “Cooked: Survival by Zip Code” with producer Fenell Doremus.

|
(Roman Boed / Flickr)

Rising temperatures this week could lead to unhealthy air quality, particularly for people with respiratory conditions, as the heat combines with pollution from vehicle emissions and other sources, says the American Lung Association. 

|
Russ Wilson splashes water on his face from a fountain in New York, Wednesday, July 17, 2019. The heat wave that has been roasting much of the U.S. in recent days is just getting warmed up, with temperatures expected to soar to dangerous levels through the weekend. (AP Photo / Seth Wenig)

More than 100 local heat records are expected to fall Saturday, according to the National Weather Service. Most won’t be record-daily highs but record-high nighttime lows, and that lack of cooling can be dangerous, meteorologists say. 

|
(Graeme Maclean / Flickr)

Illinois residents experience roughly two days each year in which the heat index surpasses 105 degrees Fahreneit. Within roughly three decades, that number could rise to 26 days per year, according to a new report.

|
(vargazs / Pixabay)

Rising temperatures and humidity in Chicago this week could make it feel as hot as 105 degrees outside. If proper precautions aren’t taken, you could experience heat exhaustion or heatstroke. 

|

Lake Michigan water levels are expected to top the record for June, and there’s a chance they could surpass the all-time record set in 1986. We head to the lakefront, and speak with experts.

randomness