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This combination of photos provided by the Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office in Minnesota on Wednesday, June 3, 2020, shows Minneapolis Police Officers Derek Chauvin, from left, J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao.(Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office via AP, File)

The trial of three former Minneapolis police officers charged with aiding and abetting in the death of George Floyd  will be pushed back to March 2022, in part to allow the publicity over Derek Chauvin’s conviction to cool off, a judge ruled Thursday.

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In this undated photo provided by Tanya Hayles, Hayles poses with her son Jackson, 7. (Courtesy of Tanya Hayles via AP)

As schools reopen, Black students have been less likely than white students to enroll in in-person learning — a trend attributed to factors including concerns about the disproportionate impact of the coronavirus on communities of color. But many Black parents are finding another benefit to remote learning.

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Nadia Orton, a genealogist and family historian in Virginia, opens a binder of research next to the grave of a Civil War era slave at the Lincoln Memorial Cemetery in Portsmouth, Va., Tuesday, March 23, 2021. Orton has worked tracing her own family and others to historically Black cemeteries. (AP Photo / Steve Helber)

Black cemeteries are scattered throughout the United States, telling the story of the country’s deep past of cemetery segregation. Many Black Americans excluded from white-owned cemeteries built their own burial spaces, and their descendants are working to preserve the grounds.

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In this Monday, March 23, 2020 file photo, a playground outside the Prince Hall Village Apartments sits empty near one of the petrochemical facilities in Port Arthur, Texas. (AP Photo / David J. Phillip)

Across America, people of color are exposed to more air pollution than whites from industry, vehicles, construction and many other sources, a new study has found.

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A screenshot from the “Black Voices” community conversation on Monday, April 26, 2021. (WTTW News)

Brandis Friedman and a panel of guests discuss the Derek Chauvin verdict, including what it means for racial justice and policing in Chicago and the U.S. Watch it now.

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A group of approximately 100 protesters gathered near the Cloud Gate sculpture in Millennium Park to protest police brutality on April 13, 2021. (WTTW News)

After a three-week trial, former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty of murdering George Floyd, a conviction President Joe Biden called “a giant step forward in the march toward justice in America.” We discuss the verdict, the reaction and what comes next with local journalists.

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In this Feb 24, 2006, file photo, Deborah Watts, left, and Ollie Gordon, right, both cousins of Emmett Till, accompany Principal Mary Rogers as they walk through a hallway at Emmett Louis Till Math & Science Academy, in Chicago, honoring the 14-year-old former student. Till's lynching galvanized the civil rights movement. (AP Photo / M. Spencer Green, File)

The murders of Emmett Till and George Floyd were separated by more than six decades, contrasting circumstances and countless protests, but their families say they feel an intimate connection in their grief and what comes next.

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Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y., accompanied by Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., and Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., speaks at a news conference after the Senate passed a COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act on Capitol Hill, Thursday, April 22, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik)

The Senate on Thursday passed a bill that would help combat the rise of hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

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President Joe Biden speaks Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the White House in Washington, after former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin was convicted of murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd. (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)

President Joe Biden said the conviction of former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin in the killing of George Floyd “can be a giant step forward” for the nation in the fight against systemic racism. But he declared that “it’s not enough.”

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A couple dances at Black Lives Matter Plaza near the White House on Tuesday, April 20, 2021, in Washington, after the verdict in Minneapolis, in the murder trial against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was announced. (AP Photo / Alex Brandon)

A sense of relief was palpable across the United States on Tuesday after a jury found former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin guilty of murder and manslaughter in killing George Floyd. But when it came to what’s next for America, the reaction was more hesitant. 

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In this image from video, former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin listens as his defense attorney Eric Nelson gives closing arguments as Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill preside Monday, April 19, 2021, in the trial of Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

The murder case against former Officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd went to the jury Monday in a city on edge against another round of unrest like the one that erupted last year over the harrowing video of Chauvin with his knee on the Black man’s neck.

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In this image from video, defense attorney Eric Nelson, left, and defendant, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin address Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill during motions before the court Thursday, April 15, 2021, in the trial of Chauvin, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

The defense at the murder trial of former Officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd  rested its case Thursday without putting Chauvin on the stand, presenting a total of two days of testimony to the prosecution’s two weeks.

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In this image from video, Dr. David Fowler, a retired forensic pathologist and former chief medical examiner for the state of Maryland testifies as Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill presides, Wednesday, April 14, 2021, in the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

George Floyd died of a sudden heart rhythm disturbance as a result of his heart disease, a forensic pathologist testified for the defense Wednesday at former Officer Derek Chauvin’s murder trial, contradicting experts who said Floyd succumbed to a lack of oxygen from the way he was pinned down.

Defense Begins Case in Ex-Cop’s Trial Over Floyd’s Death

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In this image from video, Barry Brodd, a use of force expert testifies as Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill presides, Tuesday, April 13, 2021, in the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

Former Officer Derek Chauvin was justified in pinning George Floyd to the ground because he kept struggling, a use-of-force expert testified for the defense Tuesday, contradicting a parade of authorities from both inside and outside the Minneapolis Police Department.

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In this image from video, Philonise Floyd, brother of George Floyd, becomes emotional as he testifies as Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill presides over court Monday, April 12, 2021, in the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin, in the May 25, 2020, death of George Floyd at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

Prosecutors’ case against former Officer Derek Chauvin drew toward a close Monday with tender memories from George Floyd’s younger brother, along with another look at the harrowing video and testimony from a use-of-force expert who said no “reasonable” officer would have done what Chauvin did.

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Moline High School, 3600 Avenue of the Cities. (Google Maps)

A Black football player at a northwest Illinois high school is seen on video sitting down in a locker littered with banana peels after a teammate threatens to break his knees if he doesn’t comply.