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This image shows Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s page in his 1984 Eastern Virginia Medical School yearbook, including a picture, at right, of a person in blackface and another wearing a Ku Klux Klan hood. (Eastern Virginia Medical School via AP)

As the fallout over Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s yearbook scandal continues, a look at recent examples of blackface in comedy again raises the question of whether the practice is ever permissible. 

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A still image from the 1898 silent film “Something Good-Negro Kiss.”

How a recently discovered film shot in Chicago more than 120 years ago still makes a powerful statement – without saying a word.

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Terrence Roberts, one of the surviving members of the Little Rock Nine, appears on “Chicago Tonight.”

We speak with Terrence Roberts, a surviving member of the Little Rock Nine, about teaching students to promote equality in their communities.

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It’s long been believed that residential segregation was a result of personal choices. But a new book argues segregation happened by design.

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Today, Derek Black is a graduate student at the University of Chicago. (Courtesy of Penguin Random House)

The son of a prominent white supremacist becomes a leader in his father’s movement – and then rejects the cause. A new book tells the story.

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New data shows Chicago residents feel either immensely optimistic or pessimistic about the city based on factors like neighborhood, race and age. We take a closer look with the authors of the poll.

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An image from the series “America to Me.” (Photo: Kartemquin Films)

A conversation with “Hoop Dreams” director Steve James, who tackles an ambitious series about racial disparity in a Chicago-area high school.

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The professor and political analyst joins us to discuss his new book “What Truth Sounds Like: Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America.”

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Valerie Jarrett speaks at the Chicago Network Women's annual Women in the Forefront lunch in 2017. (Courtesy of The Chicago Network)

In response to Roseanne Barr’s racist tweet, the former senior advisor to President Barack Obama said, “We need to turn it into a teaching moment.”

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The writer and educator returns to Chicago to discuss her new book “I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness.” We catch up with Austin Channing Brown.

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Mississippi’s long-running literary tradition includes renowned names like William Faulkner, Eudora Welty and Richard Wright. Add to that list the only woman to win the National Book Award twice: Jesmyn Ward.

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Beverly Daniel Tatum, the author of a groundbreaking book on segregation in America’s schools and neighborhoods, on why it’s so crucial – and difficult – to talk about race.

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The first black student to attend an all-white New Orleans school joins us to talk about civil rights activism and persistent racism in the U.S.

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(Derek Goulet / Flickr)

Starbucks’ CEO apologizes after the arrest of two black men in a Philadelphia store and pledges a nationwide racial bias training. Is it enough?

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President Lyndon B. Johnson, seated, discusses the 1967 Detroit riot with members of his staff in the Oval Office. (LBJ Library photo by Yoichi Okamoto)

In 1967, African-Americans took their discontent to the street and President Lyndon Johnson tasked a commission to find out why. The last surviving member of that commission talks about progress made and lost in the years since.

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A controversial political cartoon sparks a leadership change – and questions. Can cartoons go too far? And what is the state of diversity in newsrooms? We speak with journalist Adeshina Emmanuel and editorial cartoonist Scott Stantis. 

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