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Courtney Johnson, a South Side resident, stands in front of a vandalized statue of Christopher Columbus in Grant Park on Saturday, June 15, 2020. (Evan Garcia / WTTW News)

A commission charged with reviewing Chicago’s more than 500 public monuments as part of a “a racial healing and historical reckoning project” released on Wednesday a list of 41 monuments that are problematic for a variety of reasons, officials announced.

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An empty pedestal in Grant Park where a statue of Christopher Columbus stood. (WTTW News)

A commission charged with reviewing Chicago’s more than 500 public monuments as part of a “a racial healing and historical reckoning project” has identified 40 that are problematic for a variety of reasons, the group’s co-chair announced Friday.

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“Cherry” by artist Sung-Hee Min is on display at 1701 W. North Ave. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW News)

Six new works on display as part of the Chicago Sculpture Exhibit aim to get community members outside to explore the area and support local businesses as winter sets in amid the coronavirus pandemic.

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(WTTW News)

A new mural on the city’s Northwest Side bridges the gap between health care providers and the community they serve.

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Artist Cristina Vanko hand-letters a Ruth Bader Ginsburg quote on a mural Sunday, Oct. 25, 2020. (Annemarie Mannion / WTTW News)

A vibrant mural taking shape on North Michigan Avenue honors former Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her pioneering support of gender equality.

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How some Gage Park residents are giving back to their community during the pandemic.

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An empty pedestal in Grant Park where a statue of Christopher Columbus stood recently. (WTTW News)

After protests forced Mayor Lori Lightfoot to remove the city’s statues of Christopher Columbus, the city will launch an effort to “provide a vehicle to address the hard truths of Chicago’s racial history,” the mayor’s office announced Wednesday. 

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A close-up look at the new mural “The Radiance of Being” along the Chicago Riverwalk. (WTTW News)

Summer is the season for public art, and it seems like every week a colorful new mural blooms. We get up close to a massive new work of public art taking flight along the Chicago Riverwalk. 

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Late Chicago artist Sabina Ott created the nonprofit Terrain Biennial, a public art event that invites participants to display site-specific exhibits in their front yard. 

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An interpretation of Chicago’s founders has been floating across the city in an effort to connect communities from Austin to Englewood. We explore the Floating Museum’s Cultural Transit Assembly.

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“Choral” combines visuals depicting reefs with a musical score designed to spark curiosity about the underwater coral ecosystem. (Courtesy Northwestern University)

A new installation combining art, architecture and technology provides an immersive look at the underwater world of reefs.

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“Rushmore” by Kerry James Marshall (WTTW News)

The difference between graffiti and public art is generally in the eye of the beholder – and for some, they are one in the same. But discerning between the two will get a little easier for city crews in Chicago.

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(Credit: LUNA, University of Chicago, George Stahl Mural Collection)

A viewer remembers helping an artist paint vivid rainbow stripes on the walls of Lower Wacker Drive as a teenager, but she can’t recall the artist’s name.

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This weekend, the largest digital art projection in the world will be projected onto a Chicago landmark. Here’s a preview of Art on the Mart.

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After the erroneous removal of two neighborhood murals, City Council is considering a proposal to protect and formally register Chicago’s public art.

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A new art installation at Navy Pier uses a solar-powered highway message board to warn of the dangers of climate change. (Alex Ruppenthal / Chicago Tonight)

Pull over to the side of the road and consider the world-ending event taking place before your eyes. That’s essentially the message conveyed by the newest piece of public art on display at Navy Pier.