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(WTTW News via CNN)

American Airlines says it’s bringing Boeing 737 Max planes back into service. Crain’s Chicago Business Editor Ann Dwyer takes us behind the headlines of that story and more.

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(WTTW News)

Boeing announces layoffs, United announces pay cuts and a Lincoln Park apartment sells for a high price. Crain’s Chicago Business Editor Ann Dwyer joins us with the stories behind the headlines.

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In this photo taken Monday, March 11, 2019, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for TUI Group sits parked in the background at right at Boeing Co.’s Renton Assembly Plant in Renton, Washington. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren)

Boeing is inspecting more than 400 stored 737 Max jets after discovering tools, rags and other debris left in the fuel tanks of newly built planes.

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Midway Airport (WTTW News)

Traffic at Midway Airport dropped last year to its lowest level in two decades—and the decline is likely to continue as long as the Boeing 737 Max is grounded.

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In this Dec. 11, 2019, file photo, a Boeing 737 Max airplane being built for Norwegian Air International turns as it taxis for take off for a test flight at Renton Municipal Airport in Renton, Washington. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren, File)

Bloomberg reports that Boeing is telling customers the grounded 737 Max jet won’t be approved to fly until June or July. That’s months later than previously anticipated.

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In this Monday, Dec. 16, 2019, file photo, Boeing 737 Max jets sit parked in Renton, Wash. (AP Photo / Elaine Thompson, File)

Boeing employees raised doubts among themselves about the safety of the 737 Max, hid problems from federal regulators and ridiculed those responsible for designing and overseeing the jetliner, according to a damning batch of newly released emails and texts.

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Rescue workers carry the body of a victim of a Ukrainian plane crash in Shahedshahr, southwest of the capital Tehran, Iran, Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2020. (AP Photo / Ebrahim Noroozi)

It’s the latest in a string of tragic news involving Chicago-based Boeing: A 737 jet crashed Wednesday, killing all 176 people on board. We discuss that incident and what the future holds for Boeing with Tracy Rucinski, U.S. aviation correspondent for Reuters.

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In this Dec. 11, 2019, file photo, a Boeing 737 Max airplane being built for Norwegian Air International turns as it taxis for take off for a test flight at Renton Municipal Airport in Renton, Washington. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren, File)

The list of items Boeing could be forced to fix before federal safety officials let the grounded 737 Max airliner fly again has grown to include a problem with electrical wiring used for the plane’s controls.

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In this 2016 file photo, J. Michael Luttig of Boeing speaks at the Florence Civic Center during the Greater Florence Chamber of Commerce annual membership luncheon in Florence, S.C. (Joe Perry / The Morning News via AP)

Mike Luttig, who will retire next week, is the latest executive to leave the beleaguered company. In addition to CEO Dennis Muilenburg who was pushed out this week, Kevin McAllister, the head of Boeing Commercial Airplanes, was forced out in October.

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Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg (WTTW News)

After months of bad PR, public floggings on Capitol Hill and a global grounding of the most important model in its commercial aviation fleet, Boeing has given CEO Dennis Muilenburg his walking papers.

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In this Oct. 29, 2019, file photo Boeing Company President and Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg appears before a Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on “Aviation Safety and the Future of Boeing’s 737 MAX” on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik, File)

Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg resigned Monday over the deadly 737 Max debacle that has plunged the aircraft maker into crisis and damaged its reputation as one of the stalwarts of American industry.

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In this April 10, 2019, file photo a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for India-based Jet Airways lands following a test flight at Boeing Field in Seattle. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren, File)

Boeing’s 737 Max headaches continued Wednesday with news that an Irish company that buys and leases airplanes is suing the Chicago-based aerospace giant.

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In this photo taken Monday, March 11, 2019, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for TUI Group sits parked in the background at right at Boeing Co.'s Renton Assembly Plant in Renton, Washington.  (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren)

Bloomberg reports that Boeing will temporarily halt production of its grounded 737 Max jetliner next month, according to a person familiar with the matter.

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In this April 10, 2019, file photo a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for India-based Jet Airways lands following a test flight at Boeing Field in Seattle. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren, File)

Federal aviation regulators won’t clear Boeing’s troubled 737 Max airplanes for flight until sometime in 2020. That’s according to an interview that Federal Aviation Administration chief Steve Dickson gave to CNBC on Wednesday.

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In this Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, file photo, three grounded Boeing 737 Max airplanes, built for Icelandair, sit parked in a lot normally used for cars in an area adjacent to Boeing Field, in Seattle. (AP Photo / Elaine Thompson, File)

The Federal Aviation Administration said it told Boeing on Tuesday that the agency will retain all authority to issue safety certificates for newly manufactured Max planes.

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In this April 10, 2019, file photo a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for India-based Jet Airways lands following a test flight at Boeing Field in Seattle. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren, File)

Boeing still believes it can get permission before the end of the year to fly the 737 Max again.