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In this March 27, 2019, file photo, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane is shown on the assembly line during a brief media tour of Boeing’s 737 assembly facility in Renton, Washington. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren, File)

The Chicago-based company has 4,550 unfilled orders for the Max but stopped deliveries after regulators around the world grounded the plane following crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia that killed 346 people.

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In this July 18, 2018, file photo, United Airlines commercial jets sit at a gate at Terminal C of Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. (AP Photo / Julio Cortez, File)

United is using other planes to cover some flights that had been scheduled with its 14 Max jets. However, the airline said that because of the Max’s grounding it will cancel about 1,120 flights in June and about 1,290 in July.

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In this May 2, 2017 file photo, United Airlines CEO Oscar Munoz prepares to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington, before a House Transportation Committee oversight hearing. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP File Photo)

CEO Oscar Munoz says he will be aboard United Airlines’ first flight of a Boeing 737 Max once regulators agree to let the aircraft fly again.

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Boeing Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg speaks during a news conference after the company’s annual shareholders meeting at the Field Museum in Chicago, on Monday, April 29, 2019. (AP Photo / Jim Young, Pool)

It’s been more than a month since the FAA grounded Boeing’s troubled 737 Max aircraft. This week, the head of the Chicago-based company addressed shareholders and reporters.

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Boeing Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg speaks Monday, April 29, 2019 at the Boeing Annual General Meeting in Chicago. (John Gress / Reuters via AP, Pool)

The CEO of Boeing defended the company’s safety record and declined to take any more than partial blame for two deadly crashes of the 737 Max even while saying the company has nearly finished an update that “will make the airplane even safer.”

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In this April 10, 2019, file photo a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for India-based Jet Airways lands following a test flight at Boeing Field in Seattle. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren, File)

Investors and consumers have been keeping a close eye on Boeing due to two deadly crashes involving the 737 Max, which have damaged the company’s reputation for safety. 

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(Raimond Spekking / Wikimedia Commons)

The grounding of its Boeing 737 Max jets is causing United Airlines to trim growth plans for this year, and the carrier expects to discuss potential compensation with Boeing.

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In a March 13, 2019 file photo, an American Airlines Boeing 737 MAX 8 sits at a boarding gate at LaGuardia Airport in New York. (AP Photo / Frank Franklin II, File)

American Airlines announced Sunday that it was canceling 115 flights per day through mid-August because of ongoing problems with the Boeing 737 Max aircraft.

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In this photo taken Monday, March 11, 2019, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for TUI Group sits parked in the background at right at Boeing Co.'s Renton Assembly Plant in Renton, Washington.  (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren)

The Federal Aviation Administration, which will consider whether the plane can resume flying in the U.S., plans to meet Friday with safety officials and pilots from the three U.S. carriers that were using the Max jet.

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In this photo taken Monday, March 11, 2019, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for TUI Group sits parked in the background at right at Boeing Co.'s Renton Assembly Plant in Renton, Washington.  (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren)

Lawsuits mount and sales tumble in the aftermath of two deadly crashes involving Boeing’s 737 Max jet. Can the company repair its reputation? Commercial pilot Rob Mark weighs in.

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In this March 27, 2019, file photo taken with a fish-eye lens, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane sits on the assembly line during a brief media tour in Boeing's 737 assembly facility in Renton, Washington. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren, File)

The company said starting in mid-April it will cut production of the plane to 42 from 52 planes per month so it can focus its attention on fixing the flight-control software that has been implicated in two deadly crashes.

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In this March 14, 2019, file photo a worker walks next to a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane parked at Boeing Field in Seattle. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren, File)

The findings from the Ethiopian government provide the clearest link yet to a similar crash involving the same Boeing model plane in the waters off Indonesia in October. All 346 on board the two flights died.

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In this March 14, 2019, file photo a worker walks next to a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane parked at Boeing Field in Seattle. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren, File)

The Federal Aviation Administration said Monday it anticipates Boeing’s final software improvements for 737 Max airliners “in the coming weeks.”

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In this March 14, 2019, file photo a worker walks next to a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane parked at Boeing Field in Seattle. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren, File)

Senators grill government officials and Boeing representatives following a global recall of the 737 Max plane. What the increased scrutiny – and a federal probe – could mean for the aviation industry.

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In this March 14, 2019, file photo a worker walks next to a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane parked at Boeing Field in Seattle. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren, File)

U.S. prosecutors are looking into the development of Boeing’s 737 Max jets, a person briefed on the matter revealed Monday.

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In this photo taken Monday, March 11, 2019, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for TUI Group sits parked in the background at right at Boeing Co.'s Renton Assembly Plant in Renton, Washington.  (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren)

The FAA’s oversight duties are coming under greater scrutiny after deadly crashes involving Boeing 737 Max jets operated by airlines in Ethiopia and Indonesia, killing a total of 346 people. 

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