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Mark Larson (Photo © Sarah Elizabeth Larson)

Mark Larson’s encyclopedic new book chronicles the development of a unique artistic movement in Chicago through the voices of more than 300 actors, directors, designers, writers, choreographers and producers. 

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Melissa Isaacson appears on “Chicago Tonight.”

How Title IX changed a future Chicago sportswriter’s life, and paved the way for a championship basketball team from Niles West. We speak with Melissa Isaacson, author of “State: A Team, a Triumph, a Transformation.”

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President Ronald Reagan in the press box with Harry Caray during a Chicago Cubs and Pittsburgh Pirates baseball game at Wrigley Field in Chicago on Sept. 30, 1988.

The longtime White Sox and Cubs broadcaster is the subject of a new book. Author Dan Zminda joins us to discuss “The Legendary Harry Caray: Baseball’s Greatest Salesman.”

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Eve Ewing appears on “Chicago Tonight.”

A new book by local poet and sociologist Eve L. Ewing investigates the legacy of the 1919 Chicago race riots through poetry, blending verse with historical text and archival photos.

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(SharonMcCutcheon / Pixabay)

In her new book, author Susan Shapiro tells us how to prepare for the life-and-death decisions that come with a trip to the intensive care unit.

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Howard Reich appears on “Chicago Tonight.”

After four years of conversations with the Holocaust survivor and Nobel Peace Prize winner, the Chicago Tribune jazz and classical music critic wrote a book. Howard Reich joins us to discuss “The Art of Inventing Hope: Intimate Conversations with Elie Wiesel.”

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Rick Atkinson appears on “Chicago Tonight.”

Award-winning historian and former journalist Rick Atkinson spent 15 years researching and writing his highly acclaimed World War II Liberation Trilogy books. With “The British Are Coming,” he turns his gaze to the Revolution.

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The National Security Council is an integral part of U.S. foreign policy, despite the fact that most Americans know little about what it actually does. In a new book, author John Gans traces the council’s “unprecedented evolution.”

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Elliott Maraniss on home leave in Ann Arbor with wife Mary in 1944 before heading to Camp Lee, Virginia, to command an all-black salvage and repair unit in the still-segregated U.S. Army. (Courtesy Simon & Schuster)

David Maraniss has written acclaimed biographies of Roberto Clemente, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama. In a new book, he turns his biographer’s eye to his father’s experiences during the Red Scare.

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How did fights over high hats and hoopskirts shape Chicago’s downtown as a shopping destination? We talk with the author of a new book about women and consumer culture at the turn of the century.

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At a time of Jim Crow laws, how did a black man compete to become the fastest athlete of his time? A new book by Michael Kranish tells the story a trailblazing cyclist and his connection to Chicago. 

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How to raise children to be successful adults? That’s the million-dollar question for every parent. A new book by Joy Thomas Moore has some suggestions.

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In 2008, the list of items for the Scavenger Hunt included this entry: “PIE FIGHT!! Bring ten cream pies and prepare to prove your superiority old-timey comedy style.” (Courtesy Leila Sales)

Elephants, uranium and the oddest wedding you’ve ever seen: A new book takes readers inside the unusual world of the University of Chicago scavenger hunt.

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U.S. Ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman, left, and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. (Courtesy Uncharted, LLC)

Canada is America’s most trusted ally, but that relationship is at risk. In their new book “The Art of Diplomacy,” a former U.S. ambassador to Canada and his wife explain.

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Janet Napolitano (Credit: University of California)

How safe is America from terror attacks and other threats? Former Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano talks about whether the U.S. has gotten safer since the 9/11 terror attacks.

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(Pexels / Pixabay)

Chicago’s connections to the meat processing industry are well known, but the beef industry didn’t just spur the city’s development. In a new book, historian Joshua Specht says the beef industry helped shape modern America itself.

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