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Gianno Caldwell (Maryelkordy / Wikimedia Commons)

The conservative political analyst and consultant, who is also a Chicago native, discusses his new book “Taken for Granted: How Conservatism Can win Back the Americans That Liberalism Failed.”

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Scientist Dan Hooper appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Nov. 25, 2019. (WTTW News)

Dan Hooper spends his time contemplating the biggest mystery of all: how the universe came to be. He joins us to discuss his book, “At the Edge of Time: Exploring the Mysteries of our Universe’s First Seconds.”

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Author Lewis Raven Wallace appears on “Chicago Tonight.” (WTTW News)

For decades, the concept of journalistic objectivity has been a central value of the mainstream news media. But does objectivity actually exist? And if so, who and what does its pursuit serve? Author Lewis Raven Wallace joins us to discuss “The View from Somewhere.” 

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Peruvian American journalist Marie Arana talks about her new book, “Silver, Sword, and Stone: Three Crucibles in the Latin American Story.”

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“My family and my name have been totally and permanently destroyed by vicious and false additional accusations,” Judge Brett Kavanaugh said during a hearing on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018.

A new book from reporters Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly offers a detailed look at Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh a year after his tumultuous Senate testimony.

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Polish Constitution Day Parade in Chicago’s Loop, May 2, 2015. The banner reads, in English, “Two homelands, one heart,” expressing the dual nature of Polonia. (Photograph by Dominic Pacyga)

Local historian Dominic Pacyga tells us about his new book “American Warsaw: The Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of Polish Chicago.”

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(ePhotographyAustralia / Pixabay)

Rosemarie Truglio, the development specialist behind the curriculum of “Sesame Street” is out with a new book for parents to help their children learn.

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(StartupStockPhotos / Pixabay)

Julia Wallace, the former managing editor of the Chicago Sun-Times, talks about women in journalism in her new book, “There’s No Crying in Newsrooms: What Women Have Learned About What It Takes to Lead.”

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Richard Stengel appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Oct. 22, 2019. (WTTW News)

A former Time editor and State Department official on fighting for truth in the age of disinformation. Richard Stengel tells us about his new book “Information Wars.”

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Lee Bey’s new book explores architectural gems on Chicago’s South Side, such as the University of Chicago’s Law School. (Lee Bey / Northwestern University Press)

In his new book, architecture critic and photographer Lee Bey highlights visually striking and culturally significant sites on Chicago’s South Side that have gone mostly overlooked, he says. 

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New York Times reporter Megan Twohey appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Oct. 15, 2019.

In a new book, New York Times reporters Megan Twohey and Jodi Kantor detail how they uncovered allegations of sexual abuse by Harvey Weinstein. Twohey, an Evanston native, joins us in discussion.

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Naomi Klein appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Oct. 2, 2019.

Over the past year, a term new to many Americans has entered the political lexicon: the Green New Deal. One early advocate was author Naomi Klein, who joins us to discuss her new book, “On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal.”

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Author Celeste Watkins-Hayes appears on “Chicago Tonight.”

For more than a decade, Northwestern University professor Celeste Watkins-Hayes documented the lives of more than 100 women living with HIV/AIDS in Chicago and beyond. Now, their stories are featured in a new book.

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Albert Woodfox appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Sept. 24, 2019.

Albert Woodfox was held in solitary confinement for decades in Louisiana before his release in 2016. Now, he’s written a book about his experiences. He joins us to discuss “Solitary.”

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Sidney Blumenthal (Credit: Ralph Alswang)

Sidney Blumenthal, the Chicago native who formerly served as the senior adviser to President Bill Clinton and Hillary Clinton, discusses his political history of Abraham Lincoln, “All the Powers of Earth.”

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An illustration by Langston Allston from the new book “Everything Must Go.” (Courtesy Kevin Coval and Allston)

Chicago poet Kevin Coval and illustrator Langston Allston discuss their new book about Wicker Park in the 1990s – and the forces of gentrification that have changed it.

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