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Meet a local author who argues that the idea of laziness is a lie — one that’s having a detrimental effect on Americans during the pandemic.

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Satirists strive to challenge, critique and confront society’s absurdities or injustices through their humor. “(Satire is) really trying to catch your attention to say something so you’re aware of it so we can possibly change it,” said Al Gini, co-author of “The Sanity of Satire.”

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(Courtesy of Scribner, a division of Simon & Schuster, Inc.)

In 50 days, Joe Biden is set to become the country’s 45th president, but he still faces an ongoing assault on transition norms from President Donald Trump. Author Evan Osnos joins us to discuss the challenges Biden faces. 

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An illustration from DC’s “Weird War Tales” #68 (October 1978)

In the comic book world there is the Marvel universe and the DC universe. Less well-known is the Ernest Hemingway universe. But the Oak Park-born writer, a towering figure in 20th century literature, was a popular figure in comics.

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Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter’s wedding photo. (Courtesy the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library)

Jimmy Carter, who served just a single term in the White House, is widely seen as a model ex-president but largely unsuccessful president. Now, the 96-year-old is the subject of a full-length, independent biography.

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Former Gov. George Ryan expounds on the death penalty in a new book with co-author Maurice Possley titled, “Until I Could Be Sure: How I stopped the Death Penalty in Illinois.”

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A mural in Chicago featured in the new book “Boarded Up Chicago: Storefront Images Days After the George Floyd Riots.” (WTTW News)

A father and son documenting the city’s reaction to the police killing of George Floyd turn their images into a new book.

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(Courtesy Jill Wine-Banks)

She broke many barriers as an attorney in a male-dominated arena, but perhaps her greatest battle was as a tough-questioning prosecutor in the Watergate case. We speak with Chicago native Jill Wine-Banks.

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Mayor Richard M. Daley shares his skepticism about heat-related deaths in the summer of 1995. (WTTW News)

A look back at Chicago’s deadly heat wave — and how it compares to the coronavirus pandemic — with Eric Klinenberg, author of the 2002 book, “Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago.”

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An illustration by David Lee Csicsko for the book “The Skin You Live In.”

There is renewed interest in a children’s book written and illustrated by a couple of Chicagoans. We speak with author Michael Tyler and illustrator David Lee Csicsko.

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Author Mikki Kendall appears on “Chicago Tonight” via Zoom on Tuesday, June 9, 2020. (WTTW News)

We discuss the role of feminists in the fight against racism and police brutality with the author of “Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women that the Movement Forgot.”

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"Chicago Transit Hikes" showcases trails accessible via CTA, Metro or the South Shore Line. (Credits: Patty Wetli / WTTW News; Belt Publishing; Lindsay Welbers)

A new guidebook showcases the region’s best hiking trails accessible via the CTA, Metra or the South Shore Line. Because someday, we’ll ride trains again.

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We discuss viruses and the role they’ve played in shaping who we are with University of Chicago paleontologist and author Neil Shubin.

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Former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel discusses his book on “Chicago Tonight.” (WTTW News)

Move over, federal government: cities and mayors are where it’s at when it comes to actually getting things done. That’s the premise of “The Nation City,” a new book by former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

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Paul Krugman appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020. (WTTW News)

A conversation with with the Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times opinion columnist about his new book, “Arguing With Zombies: Economics, Politics, and the Fight for a Better Future.”

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Author Mikki Kendall appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Feb. 24, 2020. (WTTW News)

In her new book, Chicago native and author Mikki Kendall offers a critique of mainstream feminism. She joins us to discuss “Hood Feminism: Notes From the Women That a Movement Forgot.”