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Elliott Maraniss on home leave in Ann Arbor with wife Mary in 1944 before heading to Camp Lee, Virginia, to command an all-black salvage and repair unit in the still-segregated U.S. Army. (Courtesy Simon & Schuster)

David Maraniss has written acclaimed biographies of Roberto Clemente, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama. In a new book, he turns his biographer’s eye to his father’s experiences during the Red Scare.

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How did fights over high hats and hoopskirts shape Chicago’s downtown as a shopping destination? We talk with the author of a new book about women and consumer culture at the turn of the century.

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At a time of Jim Crow laws, how did a black man compete to become the fastest athlete of his time? A new book by Michael Kranish tells the story a trailblazing cyclist and his connection to Chicago. 

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How to raise children to be successful adults? That’s the million-dollar question for every parent. A new book by Joy Thomas Moore has some suggestions.

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In 2008, the list of items for the Scavenger Hunt included this entry: “PIE FIGHT!! Bring ten cream pies and prepare to prove your superiority old-timey comedy style.” (Courtesy Leila Sales)

Elephants, uranium and the oddest wedding you’ve ever seen: A new book takes readers inside the unusual world of the University of Chicago scavenger hunt.

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U.S. Ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman, left, and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. (Courtesy Uncharted, LLC)

Canada is America’s most trusted ally, but that relationship is at risk. In their new book “The Art of Diplomacy,” a former U.S. ambassador to Canada and his wife explain.

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Janet Napolitano (Credit: University of California)

How safe is America from terror attacks and other threats? Former Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano talks about whether the U.S. has gotten safer since the 9/11 terror attacks.

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(Pexels / Pixabay)

Chicago’s connections to the meat processing industry are well known, but the beef industry didn’t just spur the city’s development. In a new book, historian Joshua Specht says the beef industry helped shape modern America itself.

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Kathleen Belew appears on “Chicago Tonight” on May 2, 2019.

In her book, “Bring the War Home,” Kathleen Belew argues that the white power movement is more organized than previously thought.

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Emily Bazelon (Credit: Nina Subin)

A conversation with Emily Bazelon, an investigative journalist at the New York Times Magazine whose new book takes a hard look at how prosecutors contribute to overcharging and mass incarceration.

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MIT economist Simon Johnson, co-author of the new book “Jump-Starting America,” appears on “Chicago Tonight.”

In their new book, a pair of MIT economists say that if the government doesn’t start investing more in research and development, America’s future growth will be in jeopardy. Co-author Simon Johnson makes the case.

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What does ageism look like in the workplace, and how much of a problem is it in the U.S.? A new book uncovers that and more.

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Chicago native Allen Lynch is one of 74 living veterans to have received the Medal of Honor. (Courtesy Pritzker Military Museum & Library)

Long before becoming a decorated war veteran, Chicago native Allen Lynch was a victim of bullying, which he details in a new autobiography. 

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The Sun Ra Arkestra in 2008 (Martijn van Exel / Flickr)

Through a collection of cultural observations, critical analysis and hormone-tinged memories, John Corbett’s new book makes the case that the 1970s was a musical decade unlike any other.

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Michelle and Barack Obama with Valerie Jarrett at the Chicago Urban League Annual Golden Fellowship Dinner, November 2005. (Courtesy Valerie Jarrett)

Before she became the longest-serving White House adviser ever, Valerie Jarrett was a shy, bullied girl. She tells us about her new memoir, “Finding My Voice.”

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Cheryl Judice, the author of the new book “Interracial Relationships between Black Women and White Men,” tells us why she believes more black women should date outside their own race.

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