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Richard Browning of Gravity Industries demonstrates his Jet Suit as he takes off from the steps of the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago. (Courtesy of MSI Chicago)

The exhibition “Wired to Wear” aims to lift the veil on clothing and accessories that can boost your health and wellness – or just express your creativity.

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This July 21, 1969 photo made available by NASA shows the U.S. flag planted at Tranquility Base on the surface of the moon, and a silhouette of a thruster at right, seen from a window in the Lunar Module. (NASA via AP)

Fifty years after Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon, some people insist it never happened and was all a big hoax by the U.S. government. Here’s a look at some of the most common claims and how they're explained away.

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(Zsolt Palatinus / Pexels)

As the search for the Humboldt Park Lagoon alligator continues, learn more about these fear-inducing creatures – and why they shouldn’t be brought home as a pet.

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Ron Mikulaco, left, and his nephew, Brad Fernandez, examine a crack on Highway 178 caused by an earthquake Saturday, July 6, 2019, outside of Ridgecrest, California. (AP Photo / Marcio Jose Sanchez)

In the aftermath of two major earthquakes that shook southern California last week, officials in Illinois are urging residents to prepare themselves and their homes in the event of a similar incident.

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(skeeze / Pixabay)

New research by University of Chicago scientists shows that despite the positive intentions of conservationists who promote captive breeding for monarchs, the practice may not be producing the desired effect.

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(Credit: Noa Vigny Billick)

Meet Dr. Mika Tosca, a scientist who traded a job at NASA’s renowned Jet Propulsion Lab to teach climate science to art and design students in Chicago.

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Nickel, a green sea turtle rescued off the Florida Gulf Coast in 1998. (Courtesy Shedd Aquarium)

This massive Chicago aquarium was the world’s largest when it opened to the public in 1930. Today it holds 5 million gallons of water and features a dazzling array of creatures. Learn more fun facts about the Shedd.

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(Courtesy Stanford University)

Could futuristic-looking headware ultimately lead to self-focusing glasses? Rabiah Mayas returns with a roundup of the latest science news.

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A bumblebee lands on a flower. (Courtesy Chicago Botanic Garden)

Pollinating animals account for an estimated one out of every three bites of food humans eat. “Bees & Beyond” explains how the process works, traces its evolutionary history and demonstrates its impact on our daily lives.

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(skeeze / Pixabay)

The University of Chicago paleontologist takes us behind some of the most recent science stories making headlines.

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Peter Bowyer, the facility manager at AquaBounty Technologies, holds one of the last batch of conventional Atlantic salmon raised at the commercial fish farm in Albany, Indiana on Wednesday, June 19, 2019. (AP Photo / Michael Conroy)

Salmon produced by AquaBounty are the first genetically modified animals approved for human consumption in the U.S. The company hasn’t sold any fish in the U.S. yet, but it says its salmon may first turn up in places like restaurants or university cafeterias.

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Lake Michigan water levels are expected to top the record for June, and there’s a chance they could surpass the all-time record set in 1986. We head to the lakefront, and speak with experts.

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Dockless electric scooters – 2,500 of them – arrive in Chicago as the city launches its pilot program, but will riders stay safe?

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A woman rides an electric scooter in Baltimore on Nov. 18, 2018. (Elvert Barnes / Flickr)

A new pilot program will give Chicagoans another option for getting around the city. But will electric scooters help reduce transportation-related pollution? 

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In this April 10, 2018, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik, File)

Three weeks after Facebook refused to remove a doctored video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi slurring her words, Mark Zuckerberg is getting a taste of his own medicine.

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University of Chicago researcher David D. Awschalom in his lab with Ph.D. students Kevin Miao, left, and Alexandre Bourassa, on Oct. 15, 2018. (Photo by Jean Lachat)

The Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering will become the university’s first new school in three decades, thanks to a $100 million commitment from the Pritzker Foundation.

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