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In this July 30, 2019, file photo, the social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple’s App Store. (AP Photo / Amr Alfiky)

The company did not give a timeline for when it might expand it to the U.S. and other countries, only that it will be in “coming months.”

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(Pexels / Pixabay)

Why some Illinois Facebook users are suing the company over its facial recognition software for photos.

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(terimakasih0 / Pixabay)

Could you imagine life without the “like” button? Ben Grosser, an arts and design professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, tells us about “demetrication.”

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(rawpixel / Pixabay)

Another day, another data breach. This time, Capital One admits that more than 100 million of its credit card users have had their personal data hacked.

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In this May 1, 2018, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the keynote speech at F8, Facebook's developer conference, in San Jose, California. (AP Photo / Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

The fine is the largest the Federal Trade Commission has levied on a tech company, though it won’t make much of a dent for a company that had nearly $56 billion in revenue last year.

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A photo of “Chicago Tonight” host Phil Ponce, center, is edited by FaceApp to illustrate younger and older versions of him.

As the popularity of a photo-transforming app has skyrocketed, so has new concern over privacy. Derek Eder of Chicago-based company DataMade weighs in.

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(National Eye Institute / Flickr)

Scientists are often the foremost experts in their fields of study, but they aren’t necessarily well versed in the tricky science of collaboration.

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FaceApp is displayed on an iPhone Wednesday, July 17, 2019, in New York. The popular app is under fire for privacy concerns. (AP Photo / Jenny Kane)

Is a peek into the future worth your privacy in the present? That concern was pushed to the spotlight this week with the resurgence of a smartphone app that uses artificial intelligence to transform your current face into your younger and older selves.

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Richard Browning of Gravity Industries demonstrates his Jet Suit as he takes off from the steps of the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago. (Courtesy of MSI Chicago)

The exhibition “Wired to Wear” aims to lift the veil on clothing and accessories that can boost your health and wellness – or just express your creativity.

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In this April 10, 2018, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik, File)

Three weeks after Facebook refused to remove a doctored video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi slurring her words, Mark Zuckerberg is getting a taste of his own medicine.

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(Thomas Hawk / Flickr)

For years, Jeffrey Batio promised investors a revolutionary 3-in-1 laptop device. Prosecutors say it was all a lie that allowed him to defraud investors out of millions of dollars.

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Axon Immersion Training Virtual Reality (VR) headset, used in training police officers to learn the best way to interact with people who suffer with autism, Thursday, May 23, 2019 in Washington. (AP Photo / Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Axon, the company known best for developing the Taser, announced a partnership this week with Chicago police to train officers how to interact with people with autism by using virtual reality headsets.

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(Nitram242 / Flickr)

As police departments across the U.S. weigh the use of facial recognition software, several communities are raising concerns about privacy.

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(valelopardo / Pixabay)

Artificial intelligence outperformed radiologists in identifying lung cancer as part of first-time screenings, according to a new study. The technology also produced fewer false positives and negatives.

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(Chicago Animal Care and Control / Facebook)

For Chicago pet owners, finding a lost dog or cat could now be just a few clicks away, thanks to an app built using facial recognition technology.

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The innards of a supercomputer. (Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory)

From brain mapping to climate modeling and beyond: the potential impact of a new supercomputer being developed in the Chicago area. 

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