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(Courtesy of Victor Gensini)

Earlier this year, for the first time ever a small team of scientists was able to forecast a severe tornado outbreak almost one month in advance. We speak with Victor Gensini, a key member of that team.

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A Divvy docking station in the Chicago’s West Loop. (Tony Webster / Flickr)

This week the popular transportation app Transit announced Lyft was blocking users from accessing rides on New York’s bike-sharing system. But Chicagoans who use Transit to access Divvy bikes need not worry. 

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(geralt / Pixabay)

How does scientific discovery happen? And what goes right when the process works? Those are some of the questions behind a newly launched center at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. 

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John Rogers, who leads the Center for Bio-Integrated Electronics at Northwestern University. (WTTW News)

The future of medical monitoring is taking shape in a laboratory just north of Chicago. We learn about a new generation of flexible electronics.

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(Pexels / Pixabay)

Telehealth, or the virtual delivery of health-related services, is on the rise. State and federal officials gave an update on investments supporting expansion of such services at an annual conference, including a $420 million expansion of broadband services in Illinois.

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(StartupStockPhotos / Pixabay)

This fall, students at the Illinois Institute of Technology will be among the first in the country to have the option of pursuing an undergraduate degree in AI. Aron Culotta, director of the new program, tells us more.

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This March 29, 2018, file photo shows the Facebook moniker on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, File)

Facebook says it is ending its practice of using face recognition software to identify users’ friends in uploaded photos and automatically suggesting they “tag” them. Facebook was sued in Illinois over the feature.

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This March 29, 2018, file photo shows the Facebook moniker on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, File)

The changes include a tightened verification process that will require anyone wanting to run ads pertaining to elections, politics or big social issues like guns and immigration to confirm their identity and prove they are in the U.S. 

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In this July 30, 2019, file photo, the social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple’s App Store. (AP Photo / Amr Alfiky)

The company did not give a timeline for when it might expand it to the U.S. and other countries, only that it will be in “coming months.”

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(Pexels / Pixabay)

Why some Illinois Facebook users are suing the company over its facial recognition software for photos.

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(terimakasih0 / Pixabay)

Could you imagine life without the “like” button? Ben Grosser, an arts and design professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, tells us about “demetrication.”

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(rawpixel / Pixabay)

Another day, another data breach. This time, Capital One admits that more than 100 million of its credit card users have had their personal data hacked.

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In this May 1, 2018, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the keynote speech at F8, Facebook's developer conference, in San Jose, California. (AP Photo / Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

The fine is the largest the Federal Trade Commission has levied on a tech company, though it won’t make much of a dent for a company that had nearly $56 billion in revenue last year.

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A photo of “Chicago Tonight” host Phil Ponce, center, is edited by FaceApp to illustrate younger and older versions of him.

As the popularity of a photo-transforming app has skyrocketed, so has new concern over privacy. Derek Eder of Chicago-based company DataMade weighs in.

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(National Eye Institute / Flickr)

Scientists are often the foremost experts in their fields of study, but they aren’t necessarily well versed in the tricky science of collaboration.

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FaceApp is displayed on an iPhone Wednesday, July 17, 2019, in New York. The popular app is under fire for privacy concerns. (AP Photo / Jenny Kane)

Is a peek into the future worth your privacy in the present? That concern was pushed to the spotlight this week with the resurgence of a smartphone app that uses artificial intelligence to transform your current face into your younger and older selves.

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