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(Photo by ROBIN WORRALL / Unsplash)

It’s being rolled out across Chicago with much fanfare, but when will the reality of 5G communication live up to the hype?

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(Photo by Franck V. / Unsplash)

As artificial intelligence becomes more widespread, the White House lays out best practices for developing and using the technology.

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This Jan. 17, 2017, file photo shows a Facebook logo at Station F in Paris. Facebook has decided not to limit how political ads can be targeted to specific groups of people, as its main digital-ad rival Google did in November 2019 to fight misinformation. (AP Photo / Thibault Camus, File)

Despite escalating pressure ahead of the 2020 presidential election, Facebook reaffirmed its freewheeling policy on political ads Thursday, saying it won’t ban them, won’t fact-check them and won’t limit how they can be targeted to specific groups of people.

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Grace Brown, 14, poses for a portrait while jogging at the park where she does her jogging workouts for her “online PE” class, in Alexandria, Virginia on Friday, Nov. 1, 2019. (AP Photo / Jacquelyn Martin)

While online physical education classes have been around for well over a decade, often as part of virtual or online schools, technology has made possible a new level of accountability, its users say.

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The AI-powered Viz.ai software analyzes brain scans by using an algorithm and deep learning. (Courtesy: Viz.ai, Inc.)

Advocate Lutheran General Hospital is using artificial intelligence software to detect strokes via brain scans – and they say it allows them to initiate treatment faster than ever before.

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This Sunday, Dec. 1, 2019, photo shows rewards offered through Chase bank on an iPhone in the Brooklyn borough of New York.  (AP Photo / Jenny Kane)

There’s a powerful new player watching what you buy so it can tailor product offerings for you: the bank behind your credit or debit card.

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A still image from a Sprout Social video campaign. (Sprout Social YouTube)

The Chicago-based maker of social media management software announced Monday that it aims to raise $156 million in an initial public offering of stock.

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In this Aug. 16, 2018, file photo, the new Fitbit Charge 3 fitness trackers with sport bands are displayed in New York. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, File)

Nine privacy, social justice and consumer groups are calling for the U.S. government to block Google’s $2.1 billion acquisition of fitness-gadget maker Fitbit, citing antitrust and privacy concerns.

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(JESHOOTS-com / Pixabay)

Whether it’s used comically or in connection with serious topics, a new internet meme may be underscoring deeper generational divides. 

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In this Friday, Nov. 8, 2019, photo, FBI Assistant Special Agent in Charge George Chamberlin, from left, speaks as Gabriel Gundersen, an FBI supervisory special agent with the Oregon Cyber Task Force, center, and Loren Cannon, FBI special agent in charge of the Portland Division, in Portland, Oregon to reporters about the rise of cybercrime in Oregon. (AP Photo / Andrew Selsky)

In 2015, $220 million was lost to wire fraud in the United States. In 2019, losses will surpass $1.5 billion, according to WFG National Title Insurance Company.

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This March 29, 2018, file photo shows the Facebook moniker on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, File)

Facebook says it is deleting the name of the person who has been identified in conservative circles as the whistleblower who triggered a congressional impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump’s actions.

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In this Oct. 24, 2013, file photo, a person checks their smartphone in Glenview, Ill. A mysterious wave of texts swept America’s phones overnight Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2019, delivering unintelligible messages that left many people mildly confused when they woke up on Thursday. (AP Photo / Nam Y. Huh, File)

If you woke up Thursday to a weird text that seemed totally out of place, you aren’t alone. A mysterious wave of missives swept America’s phones overnight, delivering largely unintelligible messages from friends, family and the occasional ex.

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(AhmadArdity / Pixabay)

When you send messages to an Airbnb host or order food through Yelp, you probably don’t spend much time thinking about where else that information goes – or who it goes to. But that data has the potential to affect you in surprising ways.

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In this March 1, 2017, file photo, Jamey Powell, left, and Julianne Hough lead an exercise class as the participants are introduced to the Alta HR fitness tracker at Swerve cycling center in New York. (AP Photo / Mark Lennihan, File)

Google, the company that helped make it fun to just sit around surfing the web, is jumping into the fitness-tracker business with both feet.

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(Courtesy Google)

The tech giant says its computer took a problem that a normal supercomputer would take 10,000 years to solve and figured it out in just over three minutes. What might this the brave new world of quantum technology deliver?

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks about “News Tab” at the Paley Center, Friday, Oct. 25, 2019 in New York.  (AP Photo / Mark Lennihan)

The “News Tab,” a new section in the Facebook mobile app, will display headlines — and nothing else — from the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, BuzzFeed News, Business Insider and the Los Angeles Times, among others.

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