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This June 8, 2021, file photo shows the Supreme Court in Washington. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite, File)

The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Monday the NCAA can’t limit education-related benefits that colleges can offer their sports stars, a victory for athletes that could help open the door to further easing in the decades-old fight over paying student-athletes.

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A demonstrator holds a sign in front of the U.S. Supreme Court as arguments are heard about the Affordable Care Act, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo / Alex Brandon)

A more conservative Supreme Court appears unwilling to do what Republicans have long desired: kill off the Affordable Care Act, including its key protection for pre-existing health conditions.

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In this June 18, 2020, photo, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) students celebrate in front of the Supreme Court after the Supreme Court rejected President Donald Trump’s effort to end legal protections for young immigrants in Washington. (AP Photo / Manuel Balce Ceneta)

President Donald Trump has made clear that as he embraces the culture wars in the months leading up to Election Day, he’ll put the Supreme Court in his crosshairs. 

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(Joe Ravi / Wikimedia Commons)

The Supreme Court is set to have a blockbuster term, hearing cases on gay and transgender rights, immigration, abortion, guns and religion. We preview the new term with former Supreme Court clerks.

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(Joe Ravi / Wikimedia Commons)

On its final day before a summer break, the Supreme Court issues major rulings on a census citizenship question and the very controversial practice of political gerrymandering. Former Supreme Court clerks weigh in.

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh discusses Roe v. Wade during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018.

Former U.S. Supreme Court clerks weigh in on Brett Kavanaugh’s raucous confirmation hearings – and his chances for confirmation.

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The president is expected to announce his pick to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy on Monday night.

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(Daderot / Wikimedia Commons)

Supreme Court justices on Tuesday refused to rule on an Arkansas law regulating abortions. We discuss that and other hot-button cases.

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(Joe Ravi / Wikimedia Commons)

“Blockbuster” and “epic” are the words being used to describe the cases on the U.S. Supreme Court docket this term. We discuss the key cases.

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Justice Antonin Scalia was known for his biting dissents and sharp wit. But who was the man behind the black robes? Four former Supreme Court clerks join "Chicago Tonight" to talk about the late justice.

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The Supreme Court’s new term started the first Monday in October. The court docket includes hot-button cases on political campaign contributions, abortion rights, free speech, affirmative action, public prayer and presidential power. We hear from three former Supreme Court clerks about the issues before the court and how cases are chosen.