,
|
(Skitterphoto / Pixabay)

The new Clean Water Workforce Pipeline program will train workers for water-related jobs, such as those required for treating wastewater and replacing lead pipes. 

|
(Steve Johnson / Flickr)

Elevated lead levels in Flint, Michigan, and Newark, New Jersey, have made national news, causing growing concern over water safety in Chicago. Should residents be concerned about lead levels in Chicago’s water?

|
(U.S. Department of Agriculture)

As urban agriculture programs expand in Chicago and other cities, a new project aims to unearth data on one of the biggest potential obstacles to city-based farming efforts: soil contamination.

|

Mayor Lori Lightfoot wades into the murky waters of the lead pipe debate. Our politics team takes on that story and more in our weekly roundtable.

|
(Skitterphoto / Pixabay)

Chicago’s water meter installation program is on an indefinite hold after new data showed an increased level of lead in some metered homes.

|
S.H. Bell’s bulk storage facility along the Calumet River on Chicago’s Southeast Side. (Alex Ruppenthal / Chicago Tonight)

The Environmental Protection Agency will soon begin removing up to 2 feet of contaminated soil from as many as 15 homes near a storage facility operated by S.H. Bell, which handles manganese and other industrial materials. 

|
An interactive map shows results from soil sampling conducted near S.H. Bell. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency)

Regulators plan to clean up the soil of several residential yards with high levels of brain-damaging manganese, but they have yet to finalize a plan for addressing homes with elevated levels of lead in the soil.

|
An overhead view of Watco's storage terminal at 2926 E. 126th St. in Chicago. (Google)

As regulators continue to monitor manganese emissions at S.H. Bell Co., new air monitoring data shows alarming levels of the brain-damaging heavy metal near another industrial facility in the area.

|
(Pixabay)

The city acknowledges elevated levels of lead in some homes. How concerned should Chicagoans be about the safety of their tap water?

,
|
(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexxis Pons Abascal)

City officials were aware of data that showed elevated lead levels in the water of homes that had recently had water meters installed, according to a 2013 study by the city’s Water Department and the U.S. EPA.

|
A map of the zones included in the EPA’s soil testing on the Southeast Side (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency)

The ongoing probe into harmful levels of brain-damaging manganese on Chicago’s Southeast Side has turned up another, more familiar neurotoxin: lead.

,
|

The mayor’s office seeks to downplay a just-released study that found high levels of lead in nearly 20 percent of city homes that were tested.

|
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel speaks to the media on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018.

The mayor said he understands the seriousness of homelessness and the city’s lead pipes, but he doesn’t think homeowners should be treated “as an ATM machine.”

|
(trestletech / Pixabay)

City Council members tackle a $2 billion problem they say they can no longer avoid. But how will it be paid for?

|
A warning sign on a tool factory in Rockport, Massachusetts. (Ben+Sam / Flickr)

A Bensenville-based home renovation company has agreed to pay nearly $53,000 for alleged violations of federal laws designed to protect against exposure to lead-based paint. 

,
|
UIC bioengineering professor Ian Papautsky and Erin Haynes of the University of Cincinnati Department of Environmental Health present a sensor that will conduct rapid testing for human exposure to toxic metals. (Courtesy University of Cincinnati)

If successful, the portable, smartphone-sized sensor will measure human exposure to toxic metals like lead and manganese using a single finger prick of blood  – and deliver results in minutes.