|

At a time of Jim Crow laws, how did a black man compete to become the fastest athlete of his time? A new book by Michael Kranish tells the story a trailblazing cyclist and his connection to Chicago. 

|
Dawoud Bey. “Untitled #1 (Picket Fence and Farmhouse),” from the series “Night Coming Tenderly, Black,” 2017. Rennie Collection, Vancouver. © Dawoud Bey.

In a 1967 speech, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said the Underground Railroad “symbolized hope when freedom was almost an impossible dream.” Chicago photographer Dawoud Bey talks about his new exhibition, “Night Coming Tenderly, Black.” 

|
Terrence Roberts, one of the surviving members of the Little Rock Nine, appears on “Chicago Tonight.”

We speak with Terrence Roberts, a surviving member of the Little Rock Nine, about teaching students to promote equality in their communities.

|

A pair of new photography exhibitions offer a side of celebrity but focus on one man’s view of the struggle for civil rights.

|

The professor and political analyst joins us to discuss his new book “What Truth Sounds Like: Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America.”

|

The first black student to attend an all-white New Orleans school joins us to talk about civil rights activism and persistent racism in the U.S.

|

The Fair Housing Act of 1968 promised equal access to the housing market for African-Americans. But 50 years later, some say the landmark legislation didn’t go far enough.

|
Martin Luther King Jr. delivers his “Mountaintop” speech on April 3, 1968.

It is a moment seared in the memories of so many Americans: the day in 1968 they learned that Martin Luther King Jr. had been assassinated. The Rev. Jesse Jackson was there, and he shares his memories with Chicago Tonight.

|

To many, the legacy of activist Malcolm X is that of a fiery counterpart to the pacifist Martin Luther King, Jr. But to one of his daughters, that analysis overlooks his complexities and contributions to the fight for human rights.

|
Elizabeth Eckford walks to Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Sixty years ago, on Sept. 25, 1957, nine courageous African-American teenagers changed history. We revisit our 2015 interview with the Little Rock Nine.

|
(Mark Dixon / Flickr)

A group cited for its efforts to thwart white supremacists has plans to counter Islamist extremists. But after the Trump administration revoked a $400,000 grant to Life After Hate, those plans may be on hold.

|
(U.S. Department of Homeland Security)

A new Illinois program aims to educate the public on how to identify individuals at risk of radicalization, a strategy critics say unfairly targets Muslims. 

|
(U.S. Department of Homeland Security)

A state criminal justice agency was awarded nearly $200,000 in grant funding as part of a federal initiative to prevent ideologically motivated violence, but critics say the program discriminates against Muslims.

|

Debate over how an elite North Shore high school should present a seminar on civil rights and racism.

|

A stunning confession in the most notorious civil rights case of the 20th century.

|

Author Michael Eric Dyson on the challenges faced by black Americans, and why it’s up to whites to address racial inequality.

randomness