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The former home of Emmett Till and his mother, Mamie Till-Mobley, at 6427 S. St. Lawrence Ave. in Chicago’s Woodlawn community. (WTTW News)

The Chicago Commission on Landmarks unanimously approved preliminary landmark status for Emmett Till’s former home, calling the red brick two-flat a “modest home that is monumentally important.”

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This combination photo shows the book cover for "This Is Your Time," left, and a portrait of the author Ruby Bridges. (Random House via AP)

Civil rights activist Ruby Bridges has written a children’s book with a candid telling of the past and positive message for the future, inspired by the Black Lives Matter protests.

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Steve Schapiro speaks with WTTW News.

He took memorable pictures of Martin Luther King Jr. and traveled with writer James Baldwin. Steve Schapiro talks about what he witnessed in the United States back then — and what he is seeing today.

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In this Feb. 15, 2011, file photo, President Barack Obama presents a 2010 Presidential Medal of Freedom to U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo / Carolyn Kaster, File)

John Lewis, a lion of the civil rights movement whose bloody beating by Alabama state troopers in 1965 helped galvanize opposition to racial segregation, and who went on to a long and celebrated career in Congress, has died. He was 80.

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Oprah Winfrey delivers the keynote address to Chicago high school graduates during a virtual celebration Sunday, June 14, 2020. (Chicago Mayor’s Office / Facebook)

During a virtual ceremony on Sunday, Oprah Winfrey told Chicago’s graduating high school seniors they are being called to “reckon with our country’s past and determine a more equitable future for black and brown people.”

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The Supreme Court is seen in Washington, early Monday, June 15, 2020. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

The Supreme Court ruled Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects gay, lesbian and transgender people from discrimination in employment, a resounding victory for LGBT rights from a conservative court.

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“RIP Rayshard” is spray painted on a sign as flames engulf a Wendy’s restaurant during protests Saturday, June 13, 2020, in Atlanta. (AP Photo / Brynn Anderson)

The fatal shooting of a black man by a white Atlanta police officer and the death of another black man found hanging from a tree outside a city hall in California ignited new anti-racism protests over the weekend.

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In this June 3, 2020, file photo, a protester waves a city of Chicago flag emblazoned with the acronym BLM for Black Lives Matter, outside the Batavia, Ill., City Hall during a protest over the death of George Floyd. (AP Photo / Nam Y. Huh, File)

For much of its seven-year existence, the Black Lives Matter movement has been seen by many Americans as a divisive, even radical force. Times have changed.

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Protesters march through the streets of Manhattan, New York, Sunday, June 7, 2020. (AP Photo / Seth Wenig)

Young adults have filled streets across the country on a scale not seen since the 1960s to protest for racial justice after the death of George Floyd. But whether that energy translates to increased turnout in November is another question.

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Philonise Floyd, a brother of George Floyd, gives an opening statement during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on proposed changes to police practices and accountability on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, June 10, 2020, in Washington. (Michael Reynolds / Pool via AP)

Philonise Floyd challenged Congress to “stop the pain” as lawmakers consider a sweeping law enforcement overhaul, so his brother George won’t be just “another name” on a growing list of black Americans killed during interactions with police.

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A screenshot from the “Chicago Tonight” archives shows reaction to the indictment of disgraced former Chicago police Cmdr. Jon Burge. (WTTW News)

When it comes to the relationship between Chicago’s residents of color and the police and political leaders who are supposed to serve them, the city has a long, complex and deeply painful history.

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In this Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2020 photo, a visitor experiences “The March” virtual reality exhibit at the DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago ahead of the project’s launch. (AP Photo / Noreen Nasir)

Imagine being so close to Martin Luther King Jr. as he gives one of the world’s most famous speeches that you notice the creases in his face and then realize the late civil rights leader is looking you square in the eye.

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Paul Adams III appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Jan. 20, 2020. (WTTW News)

Martin Luther King Jr. was known for speaking out against racial segregation, voter disenfranchisement and economic inequality. We discuss his life and legacy with a man who marched with him: Paul Adams III.

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At a time of Jim Crow laws, how did a black man compete to become the fastest athlete of his time? A new book by Michael Kranish tells the story a trailblazing cyclist and his connection to Chicago. 

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Dawoud Bey. “Untitled #1 (Picket Fence and Farmhouse),” from the series “Night Coming Tenderly, Black,” 2017. Rennie Collection, Vancouver. © Dawoud Bey.

In a 1967 speech, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said the Underground Railroad “symbolized hope when freedom was almost an impossible dream.” Chicago photographer Dawoud Bey talks about his new exhibition, “Night Coming Tenderly, Black.” 

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Terrence Roberts, one of the surviving members of the Little Rock Nine, appears on “Chicago Tonight.”

We speak with Terrence Roberts, a surviving member of the Little Rock Nine, about teaching students to promote equality in their communities.

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