(WTTW News)

A major long-term study launched by the American Cancer Society aims to better understand cancer risk factors and outcomes for Black women in the U.S, who continue to face disparities in cancer prevention, detection, treatment and survival.

Health advocates are urging Black men to consider prostate cancer screenings as data from the American Cancer Society shows they are more than twice as likely to die from the disease than White men. (FG Trade / E+ / Getty Images)

One in six Black men will develop prostate cancer in their lifetime, according to the advocacy organization ZERO Prostate Cancer. Research from the American Cancer Society shows Black men are more than twice as likely to die from the disease than their White counterparts.

(Darko Stojanovic / Pixabay)

Even though the overall U.S. population is aging, “we’re seeing a movement of cancer diagnosis into younger folks, despite the fact that there are more people that are in the older populations,” said Dr. William Dahut, chief scientific officer for the American Cancer Society.

(WTTW News)

The death rate for breast cancer in the United States dropped 43% between 1989 and 2020, according to the American Cancer Society. Despite this hopeful news, breast cancer mortality rates still remain 40% higher for Black women than White women. 

The American Cancer Society’s Road To Recovery program has only been able to provide 25% of the rides requested by cancer patients in Cook County so far this year. (Courtesy of American Cancer Society)

The Road To Recovery program has only been able to provide 25% of the rides requested by cancer patients in Cook County so far this year.

(WTTW News)

Breast cancer is one of the most treatable types of cancer — when detected early. Despite that, it’s the leading cause of cancer deaths among Black women.

(Myriams-Fotos / Pixabay)

A new report praises Illinois for raising taxes on tobacco products and increasing the legal smoking age to 21, but says there’s still more work to do when it comes to reducing cancer rates.

(valelopardo / Pixabay)

A disturbing upward trend in incidents of colorectal cancer brings about new guidelines for screenings.

While Illinois was lauded in a new report for its smoke-free laws and rules on indoor tanning devices, the state is “exceptionally” far behind on comprehensive tobacco-control programs, according to a national cancer advocacy organization.

The American Cancer Society has issued new guidelines for women at "average risk" of developing breast cancer, raising the age it says they should start regular mammogram screening from 40 to 45. We discuss the changes and how women should go about determining their own levels of risk with Dr. Carolyn Bruzdzinski and Dr. Kent Hoskins.