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Dr. Adriana Bormeo-Ovalle and Agatha Demarchi appear on “Chicago Tonight: Latino Voices” via Zoom, Nov. 19, 2021. (WTTW News)

Nationwide, more than 3 million people have epilepsy. Of those, 400,000 are Latino. The neurological condition causes seizures as a result of a genetic disorder or injury to the brain. And while epilepsy can cause difficulties for those diagnosed with it, Latinos face an additional range of health care barriers.

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Dr. Paul Casey or Rush University Medical Center. (WTTW News)
Health care workers have been front-row witnesses to tragedy, as they’ve seen patients get sick and die from COVID-19, but also hope, as they help patients recover. What does the future of that treatment look like? 

Planning to visit a patient in the hospital? Check first.

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(WTTW News)

Like everything else in the era of COVID-19, visiting a friend or family member in the hospital has changed. Here’s what you can expect.

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(WTTW News)

Illinois hospitals are postponing elective surgeries, reconfiguring their emergency rooms and are making extra space in their intensive care units as they prepare for a spike in patients suffering from novel coronavirus. 

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(Angelo Esslinger / Pixabay)

Cancer treatment can be costly, but new findings from Rush University Medical Center suggest an inexpensive, effective treatment could be within reach. 

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In this April 29, 2019 photo provided by the University of Kentucky, Dr. Peter T. Nelson inspects a section of brain in the neuropathology lab at the Sanders-Brown Center for Aging in Lexington, Kentucky (Mark Cornelison / University of Kentucky via AP)

Some people told they have Alzheimer’s may instead have a newly identified mimic of the disease — and scientists say even though neither is yet curable, it’s critical to get better at telling different kinds of dementia apart.

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(sabinevanerp / Pixabay)

New research suggests seniors who aren’t on guard against scams also might be at risk for eventually developing Alzheimer’s disease.

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(Kristen Thometz / Chicago Tonight)

The health system said in a recent financial filing that the exposed data may include names, addresses, birthdays, Social Security numbers and health insurance information.

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(Kristen Thometz / Chicago Tonight)

The donation from Chicago philanthropists Robert and Emily King will increase clinical trials at the hospital and create a fund for nursing education. 

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(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker)

From decreasing access to opioids, to identifying patients at risk of addiction: A look at what local hospitals are doing in the fight against opioid addiction.

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(StockSnap / Pixabay)

Latinos are 50 percent more likely to Alzheimer’s disease than their white counterparts. Meet a Chicago researcher trying to find out why.

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(The University of Chicago Medicine / Facebook)

Six Chicago hospitals earned top marks for patient safety in an evaluation by a national nonprofit watchdog group. See which ones made the cut.

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Rush University Medical Center. Courtesy of rushinperson.rush.edu

We go inside the brand new building at Rush University Medical Center, which promises state-of-the-art readiness for bioterrorism.