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Paul Natkin speaks to WTTW News in September 2022. (WTTW News)

Rock, reggae, jazz, folk, R&B – he’s captured it all. We catch up with photographer Paul Natkin, and he shared stories and pictures worth many thousands of words.

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A downy woodpecker turns upside down. (Credit: Jorge Garcia)

Jorge Garcia wasn’t always a bird paparazzo – in fact, he’s only been at it for a couple of years, after a gear upgrade for his job as a technologist took an unexpected turn. The fledgling interest soon hatched into a full-blown hobby.

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(WTTW News)

Steve Schapiro started out as a freelance photographer in the early 1960s and was on hand for many of the decade's historic moments, whether the 1963 March on Washington or Robert F. Kennedy's presidential run in 1968. The Chicago resident's work appeared in Time, Rolling Stone, Life and other publications.

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A local woman sees a new image of her father through his long-lost street photography. (Courtesy Joan Tortorici Ruppert)

Local television producer and writer Joan Tortorici Ruppert lost her father as a young child. But through a collection of rediscovered photo negatives, she’s getting to know who he was before he was her father and getting a glimpse into Chicago history too. 

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(Credit: Jonathan Michael Castillo)

Many immigrants dream of owning and operating a small business. A Chicago-based photographer has a personal understanding of immigration, and he has spent years documenting small businesses. He calls his project “Immigrant Owned,” and it’s about to be expanded in a big way.

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(Copyright Sharon Hoogstraten from her book “Dancing for Our Tribe.”)

Articles of colorful clothing and ornaments tell the story of the person who wears them. The whole ensemble is called regalia, and it helps preserve the heritage of an entire community. A local photographer with roots in the Potawatomi Nation documents her people and their legacy.

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An image from “Dos Mundos” by Amalia Mesa-Bains.

In a citywide exhibition featuring 29 MacArthur Fellows throughout 12 galleries sits a particular exhibit at the Weinberg/Newton Gallery in River North. It’s exploring what it means to be Latino in Chicago.

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Jeff Garlin photographs Sarah Silverman. Garlin’s photographs will be featured at Tamarkin Camera in River North starting Nov. 11. (Credit Jeff Garlin)

Comedian and actor Jeff Garlin opens a new show of his photography featuring some of his co-stars and famous friends — Larry David, J.B. Smoove, John Mulaney – often in candid shots backstage and between scenes. 

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One of the 2020 photo contest winners, taken at Oak Forest Heritage Preserve. (Credit: Sharon Dobben)

Dig those images of flowers, birds and trees out of the iCloud and enter them in the forest preserve district’s annual photo contest. Winning images will be featured in the district’s 2022 calendar. 

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(Photo courtesy of Eduardo Cornejo / Gage Park Latinx Council)

A new outdoor exhibition in Gage Park tells the neighborhood’s history from the perspective of its residents. It’s part of a new program from the Gage Park Latinx Council that invites young people to reclaim their community’s narrative. We go for a look — and a local history lesson.

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Some photographers explore cities through their neglected places. At personal risk and sometimes legal jeopardy, they look for beauty in forgotten and faded locales. (Credit: Jerry Olejniczak)

Some photographers explore cities through their neglected places. At personal risk and sometimes legal jeopardy, they look for beauty in forgotten and faded locales. Meet Jerry Olejniczak, one such photographer in search of “Abandoned Chicagoland.”

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A Chronolog station in the wild. (Courtesy of Chronolog)

Monitoring stations have been set up at various parks and preserves in the Chicago region for visitors to snap photos, which are then stitched together in a time-lapse series to document environmental changes. 

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(Courtesy Whitney Bradshaw / “Outcry”)

Since January 2018, Whitney Bradshaw has photographed more than 375 women who participated in her “Scream Sessions.” All portraits are now on display together for the first time in a new exhibit at the McCormick Gallery called “Outcry.”

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(Courtesy WTTW’s “Chicago Stories,” 2000)

They say a picture is worth a thousand words, and that’s exactly what Lynn Orman Weiss’ traveling exhibition does, sharing through photos how women have contributed to one of the most influential music genres.

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Now through June 27, the Logan Square Blue Line station platform is a subterranean gallery featuring a selection of photographs from “The Logan Square Book — Gentrification and Preservation in a Chicago Neighborhood.” (WTTW News)

Inside the Logan Square Blue Line CTA station, a subterranean gallery features a selection of photographs from a new book about gentrification and preservation in the neighborhood, which was, for decades, a predominantly Latino community.

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(Courtesy the estate of Vivian Maier)

When she died 12 years ago, photographer Vivian Maier went from anonymous to fairly famous. Now the onetime North Shore nanny is receiving more posthumous praise, this time for a show of her mostly unseen color photographs of local people and places.