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Dion Dawson, founder and executive director of Dion’s Chicago Dream, speaks with WTTW News.

The founder and executive director of Dion’s Chicago Dream talks about the importance of providing fresh, quality produce to fight food insecurity — and the lessons nonprofits should be learning from the pandemic.

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National Louis University School of Business Dean Ignacio Lopez gives us la ultima palabra on why he says supporting Latino entrepreneurship can boost America's good fortunes. (WTTW News)

A business school dean gives us the last word on supporting Latino entrepreneurs — and how that can benefit all Americans.

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Christopher LeMark gives “Black Voices” the last word on mental health services. (WTTW News)

The founder of the organization Coffee, Hip-Hop & Mental Health gives us the last word on making mental health therapy normal — and accessible — for everyone who needs it.

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Author and Englewood native Steven Rogers gives The Last Word on “Black Voices.” (WTTW News)

The retired Harvard Business School professor and Englewood native talks about some of the ideas in his new book, “A Letter to My White Friends and Colleagues: What You Can Do Right Now to Help the Black Community.”

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Kameron Stanton and Chevon Linear give us the last word on “Chicago Tonight: Black Voices.” (WTTW News)

Meet travel enthusiasts Chevon Linear and Kameron Stanton who are using TikTok to encourage Black people to explore the outdoors. 

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Rashod Johnson gives us the last word on “Chicago Tonight: Black Voices.” (WTTW News)

The CEO of local engineering firm Ardmore Roderick tells us what he thinks the city should do to help Chicago’s small businesses.

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The founders of Lolita’s Bodega in Humboldt Park say residents have more power than they think — and it’s in their pockets. (WTTW News)

The forces of gentrification can make people being priced out of their neighborhoods feel powerless. But the founders of Lolita’s Bodega in Humboldt Park say residents have more power than they think.

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Chicagoans Isabela Ávila and Francisco Villaseñor give us la ultima palabra on how they say anyone – even teenagers – can create the change they want to see in their communities. (WTTW News)

Chicago high school students Isabela Ávila and Francisco Villaseñor give us the last word on creating meaningful change in local communities.

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Chrystal Whitfield gives us The Last Word. (WTTW News)

The creator of an Englewood community garden talks about the healing power of growing food as part of our ongoing series.

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Local mom and children’s book author Letty Belmares gives la ultima palabra on what she sees as the value of mothers to society. (courtesy Letty Belmares)

The COVID-19 pandemic has taken a toll on everyone, but one group in particular has had an especially heavy lift: mothers, who have taken on the majority of caregiving responsibilities over the last year.

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Rachel Gonzalez (WTTW News)

The violinist and bank-teller-turned-software-engineer talks about making career changes during the pandemic. 

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Shermann Thomas (WTTW News)

Urban historian Shermann “Dilla” Thomas gives us the last word on how knowing the city’s past can change the energy of its future.

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Entrepreneur Ana Hernandez gets La Ultima Palabra on working women and embracing their aspirations. (WTTW News)

Why women should take their ideas and aspirations off the back burner.

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Data engineer Lorena Mesa recommends Chi Hack Night, PyLadies, and Python Software Foundation for data and tech lovers. (WTTW News)

The theme of this year’s International Women’s Day (March 8) had a theme of “Choose to Challenge,” and data engineer Lorena Mesa wants to challenge your career aspirations. Here, she gives us the last word on Latino representation in tech.

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Rachel Allison Hall gives Black Voices the last word. (WTTW News)

The Chicago-based comedian and actor talks about making the most of a year spent at home.

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Anyiné Galván Rodríguez (WTTW News)

From Cuba to the Dominican Republic to right here in Chicago, millions of Afro Latinos speak their culture through their language and wear their African heritage on their bodies, especially in their hair texture.