|
Kim Williams, left, and Jose Williams appear on “Black Voices” via Zoom on April 25, 2021. (WTTW News)

Our trip down memory lane with the WTTW program “Our People” from the late 1960s and early ‘70s brought back memories for one former Chicagoan. Here is his story.

|
Sammy Davis Jr. appears on WTTW’s “Our People” in 1968. (WTTW)

In this recently rediscovered interview, the Grammy Award-winning actor talks with “Our People” host Jim Tilmon about how media representations affect popular perceptions.

|
A still image from video shows an interview with Diahann Carroll on “Our People.” (WTTW)

Black women’s hair, particularly in the workplace, has been the subject of endless discussion in recent years. In this rediscovered 1968 interview from the WTTW show “Our People,” actor Diahann Carroll tells a story that demonstrates it’s not exactly a new issue.

|
A still image from video shows an interview with George Kirby on “Our People.” (WTTW)

In this rediscovered interview from the WTTW series “Our People,” host Jim Tilmon gets the Chicago comedian to tell one of his signature stories.

|
A still image from video shows an interview with Godfrey Cambridge on “Our People.” (WTTW)

The comedian and actor known for his sardonic take on culture and society shares his thoughts on policing and crime in Chicago in this interview with Jim Tilmon from the WTTW show “Our People.”

|
A still image from video shows the late Jim Tilmon as host of “Our People.” (WTTW)

From 1968 to 1972, WTTW aired a groundbreaking weekly show hosted by the late Jim Tilmon. Until recently, we thought all but a couple of episodes had been lost. Chicago author, photographer and architecture critic Lee Bey helps us blow the dust off five of the interviews we recently rediscovered.

|
Jim Tilmon appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Sept. 12, 2017.

He has worn many hats throughout his extraordinary life. The Emmy Award-winning broadcaster and weatherman talks about his long and storied career.

|

Jim Tilmon discusses his career, WTTW’s “Our People,” and the impact African American programming has had on public affairs television.