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(WTTW News)

While COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations have dropped nationally, a local infectious disease expert says the situation is a little more complex than whether or not the nation is reaching herd immunity.

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Lollapalooza will return to Chicago at full capacity from July 29 to Aug. 1, 2021. (WTTW News)

More than 100,000 fans are expected to attend the massive four-day music festival that starts Thursday. “We’ve been having large-scale events all over the city since June without major problems or issues," Mayor Lori Lightfoot said.

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Lollapalooza will return to Chicago at full capacity from July 29 to Aug. 1, 2021. (WTTW News)

The massive music festival that routinely attracts more than 100,000 people per day to its stages starts next week as the delta variant drives a rise in COVID-19 cases. Should the show go on? A local music critic and an infectious disease doctor share their thoughts.

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In this Monday, May 24, 2021 file photo, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director general of the World Health Organization (WHO), speaks during a bilateral meeting with Swiss Interior and Health Minister Alain Berset at the WHO headquarters, in Geneva, Switzerland. (Laurent Gillieron / Keystone via AP, File)

The head of the World Health Organization said the COVID-19 delta variant, first seen in India, is “the most transmissible of the variants identified so far,” and warned it is now spreading in at least 85 countries.

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(Annie Spratt / Unsplash)

Dozens of different at-home COVID-19 tests are now available from big-box retailers and pharmacies. But before you run out and buy one, a few words of caution from Dr. Emily Landon, an infectious disease specialist at UChicago Medicine.

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Gov. J.B. Pritzker receives the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 at a mass vaccination site in Springfield. (WTTW News)

Health officials said they were acting “out of an abundance of caution” following six cases of a rare and severe type of blood clot in individuals who got the one-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

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(Photo by Lightscape / Unsplash)

Three times in the past year, officials have trumpeted the news that COVID-19 case rates had dropped, prompting them to allow businesses to reopen or expand capacity. And three times, officials have returned to the microphones approximately one month later to warn that COVID-19 was spreading fast.

Plus: Dr. Emily Landon talks new rules on ‘Chicago Tonight’

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Granby kindergarten school teacher Christina Kibby receives the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine by pharmacist Madeline Acquilano, left, at Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Conn., Wednesday, March 3, 2021.(AP Photo / Jessica Hill)

Fully vaccinated Americans can gather with other vaccinated people indoors without wearing a mask or social distancing, according to long-awaited guidance from federal health officials.

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(WTTW News)

It took less than a year for pharmaceutical companies to successfully develop vaccines for COVID-19. The unprecedented time frame has raised questions for some about the vaccine’s safety. We learn about the science behind the shots.

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Dr. Emily Landon appears on “Chicago Tonight” via Zoom on Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021. (WTTW News)

The Trump administration on Tuesday instructed states to begin vaccinating Americans over age 65 for COVID-19, as well as those with chronic medical conditions. We discuss Chicago’s rollout with an infectious disease specialist.

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Plus: Dr. Emily Landon discusses the approval with ‘Chicago Tonight’

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Documents created by Pfizer for the meeting with the Food and Drug Administration advisory panel, as Pfizer seeks approval for emergency use of their COVID-19 vaccine, are seen on Thursday, Dec. 10, 2020. (AP Photo / Jon Elswick)

Shots could begin within days, depending on how quickly the Food and Drug Administration signs off, as expected, on the expert committee’s recommendation.

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(WTTW News)

Medical professionals in Chicago and across the country are braced for a fresh surge of coronavirus cases after millions of Americans ignored advice not to travel or gather over the Thanksgiving holiday. Dr. Emily Landon, an infectious disease specialist at UChicago Medicine, weighs in.

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(Image by vivienviv0 from Pixabay)

The COVID-19 pandemic means this year’s holiday season will be like no other. Dr. Emily Landon, an infectious disease specialist at UChicago Medicine, gives advice on how to safely navigate the holidays.

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Gov. J.B. Pritzker provides an update Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020 about the coronavirus in Illinois. (WTTW News)

Gov. J.B. Pritzker issued a grave warning on Thursday as Illinois officials reported 6,363 new confirmed cases of COVID-19, telling residents that the pandemic has entered the most dangerous phase since the spring.

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Dr. Emily Landon holds up a bar of soap she made. The infectious disease expert has been making soaps and candles for years. (WTTW News)

Dr. Emily Landon is one of the city’s preeminent experts on the coronavirus, which has dominated her life for the past six months. To unwind, Landon makes her own soap – a hobby she started years ago.

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Dr. Emily Landon appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Monday, July 13, 2020. (WTTW News)

COVID-19 numbers are rising nationally to startling new highs. Cases in the city and state are also climbing. What’s going on? We check in with Dr. Emily Landon of UChicago Medicine.