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The flag flies at half-staff at the Supreme Court on the morning after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 87, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020 in Washington. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

Just 44 days before President Donald Trump’s reelection will be decided, Republicans are looking to a Supreme Court nomination fight to unite a deeply fractured party as it faces the very real possibility of losing the White House.

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President Bill Clinton looks on as Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks after the announcement of her nomination to the Supreme Court in June 1993. (Sharon Farmer / National Archives and Records Administration)

She is known as the “Notorious RBG.” Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is celebrating a work anniversary this week. We reflect on her career with her son, James Ginsburg, and local attorneys.

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In this June 18, 2020, photo, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) students celebrate in front of the Supreme Court after the Supreme Court rejected President Donald Trump’s effort to end legal protections for young immigrants in Washington. (AP Photo / Manuel Balce Ceneta)

President Donald Trump has made clear that as he embraces the culture wars in the months leading up to Election Day, he’ll put the Supreme Court in his crosshairs. 

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House Democratic impeachment managers, from left, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., Rep. Jason Crow, D-Colo., Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., arrive for the start of the third day of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

It’s day two of opening arguments in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump, and House managers are laying out their case for abuse of power. A former Supreme Court clerk offers his take on the proceedings so far.

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In this July 31, 2019 file photo, then-national security adviser John Bolton speaks to media at the White House in Washington. (AP Photo / Carolyn Kaster)

After a two-week recess, the battle over President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial has resumed, but former national security adviser John Bolton’s announcement that he would be willing to testify before a Senate trial may have changed the dynamics of the fight.

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President Donald Trump listens during a roundtable with governors on government regulations in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Monday, Dec. 16, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)

With the House of Representatives racing toward an impeachment vote, President Donald Trump will likely become the third president to face a Senate trial. A look at what’s known about that process.

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Stanford University law professor Pamela Karlan testifies before the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019. (WTTW News)

The House Judiciary Committee holds its first hearing as it weighs articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. Local law professors Tom Ginsburg and David Franklin discuss the testimony and what lies ahead.

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh discusses Roe v. Wade during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018.

Former U.S. Supreme Court clerks weigh in on Brett Kavanaugh’s raucous confirmation hearings – and his chances for confirmation.

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Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh speaks Monday, July 9, 2018 as President Donald Trump looks on.

The battle has just begun over President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy.

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(Matt H. Wade / Wikipedia)

A look at the cases to watch as U.S. Supreme Court decisions start rolling in.

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Justice Antonin Scalia was known for his biting dissents and sharp wit. But who was the man behind the black robes? Four former Supreme Court clerks join "Chicago Tonight" to talk about the late justice.

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The Supreme Court’s new term started the first Monday in October. The court docket includes hot-button cases on political campaign contributions, abortion rights, free speech, affirmative action, public prayer and presidential power. We hear from three former Supreme Court clerks about the issues before the court and how cases are chosen.

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The Supreme Court punts a case on affirmative action in college admissions back down to the lower court. Read the decision.