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(WTTW News)

Intense criticism has not prompted Mayor Lori Lightfoot to rethink her plan to demand that the Chicago City Council give the city’s Law Department the authority to sue the leaders of Chicago’s gangs and “go after their blood money.”

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Music fans line up to enter Lollapalooza on the first day of the festival, which returned to Grant Park from July 29 through Aug. 1, 2021. (WTTW News)

COVID-19 infections are again rising in Chicago following Lollapalooza, which drew hundreds of thousands of people to Grant Park last weekend. But the city’s top doctor says the four-day event is not to blame.

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(WTTW News)

More and more colleges and universities are making vaccination for COVID-19 a requirement in the fall. Other businesses are more circumspect. But during a global pandemic, should vaccines be mandatory? And what are your rights if you refuse a vaccine?

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(WTTW News)

As COVID-19 vaccine eligibility expands, a growing number of companies say they will require proof of vaccination before opening their doors. We weigh the legal and ethical concerns surrounding vaccine passports as the country looks to reopen. 

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Thursday marks the 55th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act. Where the fight for ballot access goes next.

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Associated Press videojournalist Robert Bumsted reminds a police officer that the press are considered “essential workers” and are allowed to be on the streets despite a curfew, Tuesday, June 2, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo / Wong Maye-E)

Journalists alarmed by dozens of incidents where reporters were shot at, manhandled, gassed or arrested while covering demonstrations touched off by the death of Minnesota man George Floyd are fighting back legally.

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Abortion rights activists rally in Chicago on Wednesday, March 4, 2020. (WTTW News)

Abortion rights activists rally downtown as the Supreme Court considers a restrictive abortion law in Louisiana.

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How far can the government go to fight the war on terror? Carol Marin and her guests tackle contentious legislation that seemingly allows the indefinite detention without trial of terror suspects -- even if they are U.S. citizens.