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The vacant land near Higgins Road and Cumberland Avenue that GlenStar wants to transform into a 297-apartment complex. (Credit: Google Maps)

The proposal from Glenstar at 8535 W. Higgins Road will build the 41st Ward’s first affordable housing in decades amid a cluster of hotels and office mid-rises along the Kennedy Expressway near O’Hare Airport and steps away from the CTA Blue Line.

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The vacant land near Higgins Road and Cumberland Avenue that GlenStar wants to transform into a 297-apartment complex. (Credit: Google Maps)

The committee vote represents a nearly unprecedented rebuke of the decades-old tradition of giving alderpeople the final say over housing developments in their wards.

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The vacant land near Higgins Road and Cumberland Avenue that GlenStar wants to transform into a 297-apartment complex. (Credit: Google Maps)

Members of the Chicago City Council have until Friday to respond to 10 questions posed by federal officials probing whether aldermanic prerogative has created a hyper-segregated city rife with racism and gentrification.

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(WTTW News)

The Chicago City Council may be forced to confront the role its decades-old tradition of giving aldermen the final say over housing developments in their wards has played in creating a hyper-segregated city rife with racism and gentrification. 

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Most Chicago homeowners–with the exception of some 18 aldermen–are facing property tax increases and the prospect of more to come. Will the tax hikes dampen home sales?

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Chicago's old main post office. (Brianbobcat / Creative Commons)

The building that thousands of cars drive under every day will be turned into commercial office space. Looking at the future of a building that's been empty since 1997. 

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Crain’s Chicago Business managing editor Ann Dwyer reports on the closure of an Illinois Obamacare provider, vacancies in the Trump Tower and Lake Forest's stagnate real estate market. 

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A social media campaign calls on developers to halt second-story additions to Chicago’s bungalows.

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Chicago is seeing a rise in high-rise construction with 34 new buildings over 200 feet tall currently under construction. That number has doubled in the last 15 months. What’s causing the sky-high building boom? Curbed Chicago editor AJ LaTrace joins "Chicago Tonight" to explain.

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After a decade of volatility, national home prices rose a steady 4 to 5 percent in 2015. Unfortunately, that was not the case in the Chicago market, where single family home prices rose by a meager 1.3 percent. Real estate reporter Dennis Rodkin has more on the state of the local market.