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Community organizer Jahmal Cole appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020. (WTTW News)

A new book and sign campaign points out daily inequities in some of Chicago’s underserved neighborhoods. We speak with Jahmal Cole, CEO and founder of the nonprofit My Block, My Hood, My City.

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Ald. Stephanie Coleman, 16th Ward, speaks to Paris Schutz of “Chicago Tonight” at a town hall for the Englewood community on Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2020. (WTTW News)

Can one Chicago neighborhood overcome its political divisions to exert more influence in City Council? Five aldermen representing portions of Englewood held a historic town hall Tuesday to try and do just that.

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Chicago’s popular 606 elevated trail. (WTTW News)

Chicago’s popular 606 trail has led to skyrocketing property values in the surrounding area. Several aldermen now say they want to hit pause on some development because it’s leading to displacement of longtime residents. But the plan has its critics.

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(Jason Mrachina / Flickr)

A group of aldermen have introduced a long-discussed ordinance directing the city’s Transportation Department to install noise monitors along Lake Shore Drive, with an eye toward cracking down on illegally modified motorcycles that race up and down the highway.

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(WTTW News)

Last year, 86% of the nearly 490,000 traffic stops made by Chicago police involved a driver of color, according to the ACLU of Illinois. Of those, 300,000 stops involved a black driver.

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The Wilson CTA Red Line station. (WTTW News)

Northbound Red Line trains will run express between Wilson and Howard from 10 p.m. Friday until 4 a.m. Monday as part of the CTA’s Red and Purple Line modernization project. 

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(WTTW News)

For the first time in over a decade, Chicago has a stand-alone Department of Housing dedicated to providing affordable options for city residents. How that department plans to increase affordable housing and fight segregation. 

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Four years ago, Argyle Street in Uptown was dramatically reimagined. How the single-level streetscape, now permanent, is working – and whether it can serve as a model in other neighborhoods.

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Northeastern Illnois University’s El Centro campus in Avondale (World Architects / Facebook)

More than 350 buildings open their doors to the public this weekend. Geoffrey Baer takes us behind the scenes of several unique buildings featured as part of Open House Chicago.

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Carey Pinkowski appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Thursday, Oct. 10, 2019.

On Sunday, the Chicago Marathon will host around 45,000 participants and an estimated 1.7 million spectators across the city. For 30 years, Carey Pinkowski has been at the helm of the massive event.

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(Courtesy Chicago Public Library)

As real estate development booms in pockets of the city, it feels like a new neighborhood is introduced every few months. This may seem like a relatively recent phenomenon, but in Chicago, the practice goes back decades. Geoffrey Baer explains.

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An illustration by Langston Allston from the new book “Everything Must Go.” (Courtesy Kevin Coval and Allston)

Chicago poet Kevin Coval and illustrator Langston Allston discuss their new book about Wicker Park in the 1990s – and the forces of gentrification that have changed it.

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A Chicago Department of Transportation rendering shows what a new bike lane configuration on Dickens Avenue would look like.

A proposal to add a so-called greenway for cyclists and introduce pedestrian-focused safety measures on a Lincoln Park side street has sparked an outpouring of attention from neighbors.

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Jonathan Kelly, co-founder of the Lawndale Pop-Up Spot. (WTTW News)

How some West Side residents are hoping to change the narrative of their community with a new safe space in the form of a museum.

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Water line repairs can be a costly mess. But what if there was a way to fix old water mains without tearing up streets, and old trees? There actually is, and Chicago is dipping into the waters of this technology with a pilot program. 

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Rent control has been barred in Illinois since 1997 but is once again under consideration. How does it work, and is it the answer to Chicago’s affordable housing crisis?

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