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In this April 30, 2014 file photo, retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens prepares to testify on the ever-increasing amount of money spent on elections as he appears before the Senate Rules Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo, File)

John Paul Stevens moved left as the Supreme Court shifted to the right during his nearly 35 years as a justice. That’s how the bow-tie wearing Republican from the Midwest emerged as the leader of the high court’s liberal wing.

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In this May 20, 2013 file photo, retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens talks about his views and career during a forum at the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston. (AP Photo / Michael Dwyer, File)

John Paul Stevens, the bow-tied, independent-thinking, Republican-nominated justice who unexpectedly emerged as the Supreme Court’s leading liberal, died Tuesday in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, after suffering a stroke Monday.

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President Donald Trump talks to reporters on the South Lawn of the White House before departing for his Bedminster, New Jersey golf club, Friday, July 5, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)

President Donald Trump said Friday he is “very seriously” considering an executive order to try to force the inclusion of a citizenship question as part of the 2020 Census.

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In this May 23, 2019 photo, the U.S. Supreme Court building at dusk on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / Patrick Semansky)

More than 200 corporations, including many of America’s best-known companies, are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that federal civil rights law bans job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

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In this May 23, 2019 photo, the U.S. Supreme Court building at dusk on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / Patrick Semansky)

The Supreme Court will decide whether President Donald Trump can end an Obama-era program shielding young immigrants from deportation. The program protects about 700,000 people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children or came with families that overstayed visas.

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(Joe Ravi / Wikimedia Commons)

On its final day before a summer break, the Supreme Court issues major rulings on a census citizenship question and the very controversial practice of political gerrymandering. Former Supreme Court clerks weigh in.

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In this June 20, 2019 file photo, the Supreme Court is seen under stormy skies in Washington. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite, File)

In two politically charged rulings, the Supreme Court dealt a huge blow Thursday to efforts to combat the drawing of electoral districts for partisan gain but also put a hold on the Trump administration’s effort to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

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This Feb. 5, 2013, file photo, shows exterior of the now closed Sweet Cakes by Melissa in Gresham, Oregon.  The Supreme Court is throwing out an Oregon court ruling against bakers who refused to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple. (Everton Bailey Jr. / The Oregonian via AP)

The Supreme Court decided Monday against a high-stakes, election-year case about the competing rights of gay and lesbian couples and merchants who refuse to provide services for same-sex weddings.

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(Daderot / Wikimedia Commons)

The Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday on whether the 2020 census should ask about citizenship. Observers say the justices appear divided along ideological lines, giving an edge to the proposed change.

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(Daderot / Wikimedia Commons)

Although a ninth judge has yet to be confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court, the show must go on. The eight justices returned to the Temple of Justice this week to hear a new set of lawsuits.

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“My family and my name have been totally and permanently destroyed by vicious and false additional accusations,” Judge Brett Kavanaugh said during a hearing on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018.

Local reaction to emotional testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee from Judge Brett Kavanaugh and his accuser Christine Blasey Ford.

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Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh are sworn in Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

It was a long day for the Senate Judiciary Committee, and an even longer one for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and one of the women accusing him of sexual misconduct, Christine Blasey Ford.

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh discusses Roe v. Wade during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018.

The Supreme Court nominee is strongly denying new accusations of sexually aggressive behavior in high school, calling them “ridiculous and from the Twilight Zone.”

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh discusses Roe v. Wade during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018.

With a Supreme Court nominee’s confirmation in question, a nationwide debate has ignited over how much weight should be given to a decades-old allegation.

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As the makeup of the Supreme Court shifts, a timely new book examines how the court has influenced America’s public schools.

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh discusses Roe v. Wade during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018.

For the second time in U.S. history, a Supreme Court nominee stands accused of sexual assault. What the allegations mean for Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination.