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More than 26 million American adults are estimated to have a food allergy, with shellfish reported as the top allergen, according to a new study by Northwestern University and Lurie Children’s Hospital.

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 (stevepb / Pixabay)

There is no definitive test to diagnosis the progressive neurodegenerative disease. But that could change, thanks to new research that was able to accurately detect ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases using graphene.

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A new study links higher levels of key nutrients associated with the Mediterranean diet to more efficient brain connectivity and performance on cognitive tests in older adults. 

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(Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

There is no cure for Ebola, the severe and often fatal illness that killed more than 11,000 people between 2014 and 2016. But researchers believe their discovery could pave the way for the development of an effective treatment.

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While fewer teens are using traditional cigarettes, more are turning to e-cigarettes. The trend “sets youth tobacco control programs backward more than 10 years,” said researcher Scott Hays.

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(Free-Photos / Pixabay)

A new study finds an online program that teaches teens coping skills is effective at reducing depressive symptoms, especially among those with more severe symptoms.

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Band-Aid-like wearable shunt monitor, as seen on woman's neck. (Courtesy of Northwestern University)

More than 1 million Americans live with brain shunts and the constant threat of their failure, which can be fatal. A new, noninvasive skin sensor can detect whether a shunt is working in minutes.

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More than 50 people were killed on Oct. 1, 2017 when a gunman opened fire at a concert in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Las Vegas residents donated nearly 800 units of blood after last year’s mass shooting, but new research shows that many of those donations weren’t needed – and some even went to waste.

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(Steve Johnson / Flickr)

An estimated 15 million people in the U.S. – including thousands of Chicago residents – experienced water shutoffs in 2016, in many cases because they failed to pay their water bills. 

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A gene associated with the learning disorder dyslexia may make some athletes less susceptible to concussions, according to a new study by Northwestern Medicine and Penn State University.

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Nathan Copeland, who was paralyzed from the chest down in a car accident, controls a prosthetic arm and hand at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. (Photo courtesy of Pitt / UPMC)

University of Chicago researchers will develop robotic arms that patients can move with their brains, thanks to a grant from the National Institutes of Health.

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(Marco Verch / Flickr)

A common but preventable gum infection may facilitate the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study by the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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An inexpensive drug for Type 2 diabetes also decreases the risk of heart attacks and strokes caused by air pollution, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.

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(stevepb / Pixabay)

In the last two decades, only four drugs have been approved to treat Alzheimer’s symptoms, according to a new report. “I’m very optimistic that within 10 years we’ll have a breakthrough,” said Dr. Doug Williamson of biopharmaceutical company Lundebeck.

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(David Kessler / Flickr)

Researchers say adverse drug events are a leading cause of injury and death among children and adolescents, yet there has been a lack of information about how this population uses prescription medicine.

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(Free-Photos / Pixabay)

Researchers will study an online intervention program and in-person group therapy program designed for teens to see which is better at helping them cope with tough situations and feel more hopeful. 

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