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Dr. Igor Koralnik, left, examines a patient. (Credit: Northwestern Medicine)

A new Northwestern Medicine study of 52 long haulers, who were not hospitalized and only experienced mild symptoms like cough and sore throat, found that most continued to experience neurologic symptoms, fatigue and compromised quality of life up to 18 months after initial infection. 

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(valelopardo/ Pixabay)

Nearly 40 cities across the country are recruiting 4,000 young adults ages 25-35 to participate in a study that will track and analyze their lung health over their lifetime to better understand how environment, lifestyle and physical activity impact respiratory health.

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People walk in Chicago’s Northalsted neighborhood in September 2020. (WTTW News)

Why do some people experience long-term effects after having COVID-19? And what can be done to speed recovery and prevent it? Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago are part of a national effort to answer those questions and more. 

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A woman receives a COVID-19 vaccine injection by a pharmacist at a clinic in Lawrence, Mass., on Wednesday, Dec. 29, 2021. (AP Photo / Charles Krupa, File)

An early look at the performance of COVID-19 booster shots during the recent omicron wave in the U.S. showed a decline in effectiveness against severe cases, though the shots still offered strong protection. 

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(Valelopardo / Pixabay)

A new study has found cannabidiol or CBD can block COVID-19 infection in human cells and mice, but don’t rush out and buy products from your local dispensary. Here’s what you need to know about the study and where things stand with COVID-19 treatments.  

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A dose of a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is prepared at Lurie Children's hospital, Nov. 5, 2021, in Chicago. (AP Photo / Nam Y. Huh, File)

The papers echo previous research — including studies in Germany, South Africa and the U.K. — indicating available vaccines are less effective against omicron than earlier versions of the coronavirus, but also that boosters significantly improve protection.

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(Photo by James Yarema on Unsplash)

The number of Americans 55 and older who died from an opioid overdose surged 1,886% from a little over 500 deaths in 1999 to more than 10,000 deaths two decades later, according to a new report.

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(Nese Dolan / Pexels)

If the thought of drinking a caramel brownie iced coffee or peppermint mocha latte sounds like a punishment, you might be a coffee snob or, according to a new study, a preference for bitter cups of plain black joe just might be in your DNA.

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(WTTW News)

A new study shows that vaccination against a coronavirus or a previous infection can provide protection against other viruses in that same family – and it shows that generic vaccines could be developed to protect against future viruses.

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(Free-Photos / Pixabay)

A new Northwestern Medicine study has found increased stress during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with irregularities in menstrual cycles.

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In this Sept. 7, 2020 file photo, students wearing face masks to help curb the spread of the coronavirus walk in line as they arrive at a primary school in Beijing. (AP Photo / Andy Wong, File)

Research suggests vision problems increased among Chinese schoolchildren during pandemic restrictions and online learning, and eye specialists think the same may have happened in U.S. kids. 

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This April 28, 2021, file photo shows the U.S. Capitol building in Washington. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Ten years after the 9/11 attacks, Americans were reasonably positive about the state of their rights and liberties. Today, after 20 years, not as much.

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A new study suggests large, urban environments promote lower rates of depression among city residents, in comparison to suburbs and towns, due to the increased daily social interaction cities and the built environment facilitate. (WTTW News)

A new study suggests large, urban environments promote lower rates of depression among city residents, in comparison to suburbs and towns, due to the increased daily social interaction cities and the built environment facilitate.

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(Free-Photos / Pixabay)

Drinking at least one cup of coffee per day was associated with a decreased risk of about 10% when it came to contracting COVID-19, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.

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(WTTW News)

A study analyzing whether the COVID-19 vaccine prevents infection and spread of the coronavirus among college students has been expanded to include adults ages 18-29, including those who choose not to get vaccinated.

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(WTTW News)

A rare inflammatory condition linked to kids with coronavirus infections is more likely to occur in Black, Latino and Asian children than their white counterparts, according to a new study. “This virus does not affect everyone equally,” said pediatrician Dr. Patrick Seed.