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It’s long been believed that residential segregation was a result of personal choices. But a new book argues segregation happened by design.

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New data shows Chicago residents feel either immensely optimistic or pessimistic about the city based on factors like neighborhood, race and age. We take a closer look with the authors of the poll.

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An image from the series “America to Me.” (Photo: Kartemquin Films)

A conversation with “Hoop Dreams” director Steve James, who tackles an ambitious series about racial disparity in a Chicago-area high school.

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(Ian Freimuth / Flickr)

Many studies on breast cancer have shown racial disparities in diagnosis and survival rates. New research suggests characteristics of a woman’s neighborhood could be contributing to those disparities.

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Chicago History Museum curator Joy Bivins

What does race mean to you? An exhibit at the Chicago History Museum asks visitors to consider how much we focus on race every day, whether we realize it or not.

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A new report from the Metropolitan Planning Council makes more than two dozen recommendations to reduce the economic costs of segregation.

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Beverly Daniel Tatum, the author of a groundbreaking book on segregation in America’s schools and neighborhoods, on why it’s so crucial – and difficult – to talk about race.

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The first black student to attend an all-white New Orleans school joins us to talk about civil rights activism and persistent racism in the U.S.

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(Derek Goulet / Flickr)

Starbucks’ CEO apologizes after the arrest of two black men in a Philadelphia store and pledges a nationwide racial bias training. Is it enough?

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The Fair Housing Act of 1968 promised equal access to the housing market for African-Americans. But 50 years later, some say the landmark legislation didn’t go far enough.

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President Lyndon B. Johnson, seated, discusses the 1967 Detroit riot with members of his staff in the Oval Office. (LBJ Library photo by Yoichi Okamoto)

In 1967, African-Americans took their discontent to the street and President Lyndon Johnson tasked a commission to find out why. The last surviving member of that commission talks about progress made and lost in the years since.

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West Garfield Park residents have a life expectancy of 69 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 85 years in the Loop. By 2030, West Side United hopes to cut that life expectancy gap in half.

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A scorching accusation by a candidate for Illinois governor adds fuel to the gentrification debate in Chicago.

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Tough talk about segregation from MacArthur “genius” grant recipient and journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones.

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Chicago History Museum curator Joy Bivins

What does race mean to you? A new exhibit at the Chicago History Museum asks visitors to consider how much all of us focus on race every day, whether we realize it or not.

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Elizabeth Eckford walks to Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Sixty years ago, on Sept. 25, 1957, nine courageous African-American teenagers changed history. We revisit our 2015 interview with the Little Rock Nine.

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