Plus: Analysis of the attack on ‘Chicago Tonight’

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The U.S. Treasury Department building viewed from the Washington Monument, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo / Patrick Semansky, file)

U.S. government agencies and private companies rushed to secure their computer networks following the disclosure of a sophisticated and long-running cyber-espionage intrusion suspected of being carried out by Russian hackers. 

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In this file photo, President Donald Trump’s former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn arrives at federal court in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018. (AP Photo / Carolyn Kaster)

President Donald Trump pardoned his former national security adviser Michael Flynn on Wednesday, ending a yearslong prosecution in the Russia investigation that saw Flynn twice plead guilty to lying to the FBI.

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In this May 22, 2019 file photo, Department of Homeland Security Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Director Christopher Krebs testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / Carolyn Kaster, File)

Iran is responsible for emails meant to intimidate American voters and sow unrest in multiple states, U.S. officials said Wednesday night in calling out both Tehran and Russia for activities meant to interfere in the upcoming presidential election.

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 In this March 27, 2019, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo / Susan Walsh, File)

Top officials in the White House were aware in early 2019 of classified intelligence indicating Russia was secretly offering bounties to the Taliban for the deaths of Americans, a full year earlier than has been previously reported.

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Alexander Kosolapov, “Hero, Leader, God,” 2007. Painted Bronze, 25 x 28 x 13 inches. (Courtesy One After 909 gallery, Chicago)

Artwork once under attack by the Russian government is now on view in Chicago. We explore a show at the One After 909 gallery in West Town.

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Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-California, stands beside a chart during a news conference following the back-to-back hearings with former special counsel Robert Mueller who testified about his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 24, 2019. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

After months of anticipation, Congress finally heard testimony from former special counsel Robert Mueller. Democrats say they will continue to hold President Trump accountable, while Republicans say it’s time to close the books on the investigation. 

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Former special counsel Robert Mueller testifies before the House Judiciary Committee in  Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, July 24, 2019. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik)

Robert Mueller on Wednesday bluntly dismissed President Donald Trump’s claims of total exoneration in the federal probe of Russia’s 2016 election interference, telling Congress he explicitly did not clear the president of obstructing his investigation.

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A file photo of former U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel (Photo Credit: U.S. Department of Defense)

Special counsel Robert Mueller says his team did not determine whether President Donald Trump committed a crime or not. Former U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel weighs in.

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Special counsel Robert Muller speaks at the Department of Justice Wednesday, May 29, 2019, in Washington, about the Russia investigation. (AP Photo / Carolyn Kaster)

Special counsel Robert Mueller said Wednesday he believed he was constitutionally barred from charging President Donald Trump with a crime but pointedly emphasized that his Russia report did not exonerate the president.

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In this May 1, 2019, file photo, Attorney General William Barr appears at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Attorney General William Barr has appointed a U.S. attorney to examine the origins of the Russia investigation and determine if intelligence collection involving the Trump campaign was “lawful and appropriate.”

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President Donald Trump speaks during the presentation of the Commander-in-Chief’s Trophy to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point football team in the Rose Garden of the White House, Monday, May 6, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo / Alex Brandon)

Political wrangling continues on Capitol Hill as Attorney General William Barr faces contempt charges and hundreds of former prosecutors sign a letter stating their belief that the president obstructed justice.

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In this Oct. 28, 2013, file photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller is seated at FBI Headquarters in Washington. (AP Photo / Charles Dharapak, File)

U.S. Reps. Danny Davis and Sean Casten join us to discuss the latest headlines out of Washington D.C., including the release of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s redacted report and the 2020 census. 

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Hillary Clinton speaks during the TIME 100 Summit, in New York, Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo / Richard Drew)

Special counsel Robert Mueller’s report is only the beginning of a reckoning on election meddling, not the end, and “raises some serious questions,” Hillary Clinton said Tuesday.

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“There’s solid evidence of obstruction, there are clear examples of collusion and conspiracy,” said U.S. Rep. Mike Quigley of the redacted Mueller report released Thursday.

After two years of waiting, the Mueller report is now out. And Illinois gets a mention.

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President Donald Trump holds up a statue of the Wounded Warrior Project logo presented to him during a Wounded Warrior Project Soldier Ride event in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, April 18, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik)

What’s in the redacted version of the Mueller report, and what it could all mean for the president.

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President Donald Trump reaches out to greet supporters on the tarmac upon his arrival at Palm Beach International Airport on Thursday, April 18, 2019, in West Palm Beach, Florida. (AP Photo / Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

As a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report was finally released Thursday, President Donald Trump resorted to bluster, broadsides and falsehoods to try, once more, to frame the moment as a political victory.