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(WTTW News)

The expansion of vaccine eligibility to any Chicago adult regardless of their age, health or employment comes a week after Gov. J.B. Pritzker ordered restrictions lifted on the state’s supply of vaccine from the federal government. Supplies of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccine are still limited, however.

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Dr. Marina Del Rios receives the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by city officials on Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020 at The Loretto Hospital. (WTTW News)

A look back on the impact of the pandemic on the Latino community after one year, with doctors Marina del Rios, Juanita Mora and Evelyn Figueroa.

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(WTTW News)

Vaccine hesitancy may have been an issue when vaccines were first being developed and rolled out, but now the main issues are equitable access and supply, according to a pair of local doctors.

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A screenshot from the “Latino Voices” community conversation on Monday, Jan. 25, 2021. (WTTW News)

The coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated existing inequities in Chicago and across the country. Check out our virtual discussion about COVID-19 with Hugo Balta, host of “Latino Voices,” and a panel of guests.

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Dr. Marina Del Rios receives the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by city officials on Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020 at The Loretto Hospital. (WTTW News)

Dr. Marina Del Rios was the first person in Chicago to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 after receiving her second dose of the Pfizer vaccine Tuesday. “I felt reassured that this was safe and efficacious,” she said.

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People wearing masks line up for a food drive in Brighton Park on Chicago’s Southwest Side on April 23, 2020. (WTTW News)

COVID-19 continues to have a disproportionate impact on Latino communities. We discuss the pandemic with Dr. Marina Del Rios, director of social emergency medicine at the University of Illinois hospital in Chicago.

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People wearing masks line up for a food drive in Brighton Park on Chicago’s Southwest Side on April 23, 2020. (WTTW News)

As Latino communities scramble to understand why the coronavirus has hit them so hard, they’re calling upon elected officials to do more to help reverse the trend of rising infection rates.