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Amazon employee Bekim Mehmedi speaks with WTTW News during a demonstration at facility in Gage Park on Thursday, April 1, 2021.

As workers in Alabama decide whether or not to unionize, Amazon employees in Chicago push for accommodations for a long overnight shift.

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Last week, Chicago aldermen approved a resolution calling for the city to use dollars from federal relief funds for a basic income pilot program. (WTTW News)

Chicago aldermen recently approved a resolution calling for the city to use federal relief funds for a basic income pilot program. Some organizations have already been testing out the idea, but skeptics are looking to build up social services instead.

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(WTTW News)

City officials announced Monday they will open a vaccination site for union workers—the first of its type in the nation, they say—designed to administer 1,200 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine per day.

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Over the years, industry has taken a toll on the Southeast Side, harming both the natural environment and the health of residents. (WTTW News)

In recent months, the tension between industry and community has escalated as protests erupted against metal scrapper General Iron’s proposed relocation to the Southeast Side. And while activists say the area has been overburdened with industry, the need for jobs with low barriers to entry is still high.

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City’s ‘Hidden Gem’ faces down COVID-19, anti-Asian hate

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Businesses line a street in the Albany Park neighborhood. (WTTW News)

For the latest in our reporting series, we visit the diverse Northwest Side community to see how it’s supporting Asian American residents amid a rise in anti-Asian rhetoric and violence. 

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Downtown Chicago (WTTW News)

While some people may have gotten used to the comforts of working from home, others may be itching to get out. The stakes for the city couldn’t be higher, especially for the owners and managers of the massive pieces of real estate in the city’s central business district that are still sitting mostly vacant.

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(WTTW News)

Approximately 84% of all Chicagoans will be eligible to get the vaccine starting Monday, according to rules set by Mayor Lori Lightfoot.

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Erica Lopez speaks with “Chicago Tonight” about the death of her mother and father, who both contracted COVID-19. (WTTW News)

From rates of infection to unemployment following the economic shutdown, some residents of Chicago have been cut deeper by the pandemic. We talk about the specific challenges facing hard-hit communities, and some of the support systems in place.

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Many Chicago businesses have not survived the pandemic and many more are only just hanging on. News that a full reopening is on the horizon is offering hope for struggling businesses. (WTTW News)

With the announcement Thursday that the state could soon begin easing restrictions as more people get vaccinated, there’s hope for struggling businesses. Business owners from across the city tell us how they’re staying afloat and share their hopes for a better year ahead.

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(WTTW News)

A coalition of health care institutions and professionals working together as West Side United are providing relief to businesses and individuals affected by the COVID-19 pandemic through small business grants and emergency rental assistance. 

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Jose Martinez (WTTW News)

With 10,000 people turning 65 every day in the U.S., the number of people with visual impairment or blindness is expected to rise significantly in the coming years. Here’s how two Chicago-area institutions have been working to support the visually impaired for over a century. 

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(WTTW News)

Legislation awaiting the governor’s signature could shut down the payday lending industry in Illinois, but payday proponents say that could lead to a host of bigger problems.

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(WTTW News)

One year ago, the World Health Organization declared the spread of the COVID-19 virus a global pandemic. With that announcement the whole world changed. Now, as the pace of the vaccine rollout quickens, a new fear is emerging for many people who have been able to work from home.

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(WTTW News)

The Illinois Tollway last month announced that it would no longer accept cash tolls, making permanent a change it rolled out early in the pandemic. But does a cashless society leave some people out?

Plus: Local Congress members talk stimulus bill on ‘Chicago Tonight’

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In this image from video, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y., speaks before the final vote on the Senate version of the COVID-19 relief bill in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Saturday, March 6, 2021. (Senate Television via AP, File)

As the latest federal pandemic relief package makes its way to President Joe Biden’s desk, Americans may be wondering when the benefits will reach them. The $1.9 trillion known as the “American Rescue Plan” is massive. Here’s you need to know.

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Logan DeWitt stands outside his home Monday, March 8, 2021, in Kansas City, Kan. Because he could work at home, Logan kept his job through the pandemic while his wife lost hers and went back to school. Their financial situation was further complicated with the birth of their daughter nine months ago. (AP Photo / Charlie Riedel)

Roughly 4 in 10 Americans say they’re still feeling the financial impact of the loss of a job or income within their household as the economic recovery remains uneven one year into the coronavirus pandemic.