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This March 29, 2018, file photo shows the Facebook moniker on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, File)

The changes include a tightened verification process that will require anyone wanting to run ads pertaining to elections, politics or big social issues like guns and immigration to confirm their identity and prove they are in the U.S. 

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In this July 30, 2019, file photo, the social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple’s App Store. (AP Photo / Amr Alfiky)

The company did not give a timeline for when it might expand it to the U.S. and other countries, only that it will be in “coming months.”

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(rawpixel / Pixabay)

Another day, another data breach. This time, Capital One admits that more than 100 million of its credit card users have had their personal data hacked.

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This Monday, July 22, 2019, photo shows Capital One mailing in North Andover, Massachusetts. (AP Photo / Elise Amendola)

A security breach at Capital One Financial, one of the nation’s largest issuers of credit cards, compromised the personal information of about 106 million people, and in some cases the hacker obtained Social Security and bank account numbers.

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In this May 1, 2018, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the keynote speech at F8, Facebook's developer conference, in San Jose, California. (AP Photo / Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

The fine is the largest the Federal Trade Commission has levied on a tech company, though it won’t make much of a dent for a company that had nearly $56 billion in revenue last year.

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A photo of “Chicago Tonight” host Phil Ponce, center, is edited by FaceApp to illustrate younger and older versions of him.

As the popularity of a photo-transforming app has skyrocketed, so has new concern over privacy. Derek Eder of Chicago-based company DataMade weighs in.

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FaceApp is displayed on an iPhone Wednesday, July 17, 2019, in New York. The popular app is under fire for privacy concerns. (AP Photo / Jenny Kane)

Is a peek into the future worth your privacy in the present? That concern was pushed to the spotlight this week with the resurgence of a smartphone app that uses artificial intelligence to transform your current face into your younger and older selves.

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Hillary Clinton speaks during the TIME 100 Summit, in New York, Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo / Richard Drew)

Special counsel Robert Mueller’s report is only the beginning of a reckoning on election meddling, not the end, and “raises some serious questions,” Hillary Clinton said Tuesday.

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“There’s solid evidence of obstruction, there are clear examples of collusion and conspiracy,” said U.S. Rep. Mike Quigley of the redacted Mueller report released Thursday.

After two years of waiting, the Mueller report is now out. And Illinois gets a mention.

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(rawpixel / Pixabay)

While the Social Security Administration may contact people by phone, employees will never threaten a person or a promise Social Security benefit approval in exchange for information, according to the agency.

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(Pxhere.com)

Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart is warning residents about a sophisticated phone scam in which an unsolicited caller claims to be a representative from Apple, Inc.

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(Kristen Thometz / Chicago Tonight)

The health system said in a recent financial filing that the exposed data may include names, addresses, birthdays, Social Security numbers and health insurance information.

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(LoboStudioHamburg / Pixabay)

After a year of security breaches, data privacy concerns and political intrusions, some Facebook users are pulling the plug. Should you?

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(Almonroth / Wikimedia Commons)

The recent Marriott hotel data breach affected half a billion people. Who’s behind the attack, and what can we learn from it? We speak with Blase Ur, assistant professor of computer science at the University of Chicago.

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(Christoph Scholz / Flickr)

A new cybersecurity plan unveiled last week by the Trump White House indicates that the U.S. could take more aggressive steps to combat foreign hackers. 

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The Department of Homeland Security recently announced that Russian-backed hackers have infiltrated the control rooms of hundreds of utility companies across the country.