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Alaaulldin Al Ibrahim, center, will attend UIC this fall on a full scholarship to study pre-med. Also pictured: Sarah Quintenz, left, and Joshua Zepeda. (Matt Masterson / WTTW News)

Alaaulldin Al Ibrahim, or “Al” to his friends, was born in Syria, moved to Jordan and eventually resettled as a refugee in Chicago. This fall he’ll attend the University of Illinois at Chicago on a full scholarship to study pre-med.

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Miguel del Valle, a former Illinois state senator, will serve as the president of the Chicago Board of Education. Mayor Lightfoot announced his appointment and six others Monday morning.

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Chicago Teachers Union members hold a rally in the Loop on Wednesday, May 22, 2019. (WTTW News)

Chicago Teachers Union members call on Mayor Lori Lightfoot to make good on promises for educational equity. Meanwhile, upheaval at a Chicago Public Schools board meeting.

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Skinner West Elementary (Google Maps)

A 39-year-old teacher was charged with misdemeanor battery shortly after he was removed from his Near West Side elementary school following allegations of “inappropriate contact” with students.

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Walter Payton College Preparatory High School (WTTW News)

Chicago Public Schools once again scored the top five public high schools in the state of Illinois, according to the annual list. All five of those schools were also ranked among the top 100 nationally.

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Myra Timms (Chicago Police Department)

Spencer Technology Academy teacher Myra Timms, 33, is facing a misdemeanor battery charge after she allegedly made physical contact with one of her male students last week.

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There’s a grassroots push for an elected school board in Chicago, but how would a move away from an appointed board impact students? We discuss the pros and cons with Jesse Sharkey and Rufus Williams.

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(Brandis Friedman / WTTW News)

To the delight of some advocacy groups and the Chicago Teachers Union, state representatives voted Thursday to move Chicago to an elected school board structure.

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Journalism students from Senn High School pose with members of “Chicago Tonight” at WTTW in October 2018. (Courtesy of Michael Cullinane)

Chicago high school students, with some guidance from WTTW, recently produced stories showcasing one family’s journey from Bangladesh to Chicago and an open mic event sponsored by Grammy-winning artist Chance the Rapper.

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CTU President Jesse Sharkey outlines his union’s contract demands in a press conference inside City Hall on Jan. 15, 2019. (Chicago Tonight)

Chicago Teachers Union President Jesse Sharkey suggests the union’s rank-and-file members save at least 10 percent of each paycheck “to make sure we can stand strong on the picket line.”

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Aaron Chang, 13, of Audubon Elementary won the 2019 CPS spelling bee on March 14, 2019.

Fifty-one students faced off Thursday in the annual citywide spelling competition, and a new champion was named to represent Chicago Public Schools in the Scripps National Spelling Bee. “Chicago Tonight” stopped by for a look.

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Chicago Public Schools missed out on as much as $2 million in pre-K payments over the past four school years due to a combination of errors, uncollected tuition and employee fraud, according to the district’s internal watchdog.

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Bowen High School wrestling coach Ron Wilson

In just a few years, Ron Wilson reintroduced Bowen High School’s wrestling program and turned it into a city and regional powerhouse. Now, Wilson, a special education teacher turned firefighter, continues to lead the Boilermakers. 

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(Don Harder / Flickr)

“I want my mama,” the 9-year-old victim pleaded as he was being beaten with a belt inside his school's bathroom, according to a lawsuit filed Thursday. His attacker told him, “I am your mama.”

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While Chicago Public Schools students make plans for their futures, we speak with schools chief Janice Jackson about the present.

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Chicago's lakefront is covered with ice on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. Temperatures are plummeting in Chicago as officials warn against venturing out into the dangerously cold weather. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)

“Since temperatures are expected to stay at dangerous levels through Thursday, we are canceling school to ensure families have ample time to plan ahead,” CPS CEO Janice Jackson said in a statement Tuesday.